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Webinar: An Unconventional Approach to Integrating Behavioral Health Treatment and Research


When: October 4, 2018
Time: 11:00am Pacific
Price: $65 Individual View/$150 Group View

1 unit EDAC continuing education
1 unit AIA continuing education

CEU forms available for download during webinar*

CEUs


This webinar is free to our Affiliate+ members.

 

Born out of a vision from renowned child psychiatrist and human geneticist Dr. Matthew State, the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Child, Teen & Family Center and Department of Psychiatry Building will be the first-ever UCSF facility for both pediatric and adult psychiatric patients and one of the first facilities in the U.S. to integrate the neurosciences with traditional psychiatry for child, adolescent and adult patient populations. The integration of these diverse disciplines under one roof will create a hub for research and training to advance the normalization, prevention and treatment of mental illness.

Set to be operational in 2020, the facility is a single structure with zones of three, four, and five stories – each with an architecturally distinct visual identity, space, and entrance. Openness and transparency in how the building will operate is a primary design driver and is emphasized through a central atrium and materials palette. The exterior respects the unique look and feel of San Francisco’s mixed-use Dogpatch Neighborhood, including street-level retail and connection to the UCSF Mission Bay Campus. A conference space is also included within the building to facilitate knowledge sharing.

This session will explore how a multidisciplinary team envisioned, secured donor support, planned, and designed an environment that supports a new care model for this highly vulnerable patient population and serves as a critical link between UCSF’s mission and community mental health efforts.

 

Learning Objectives

  • Explore the value of integrating adult and pediatric traditional mental health care services with neuroscience research in one facility, and the research and design that supports this integrative approach.

  • Understand how this unique model of care will support destigmatization of mental healthcare and how it manifests in the physically designed environment.

  • Summarize the unique model of care developed for the child, teen and family center and department of psychiatry.

  • See how the neighborhood design supports familiarity and knowledge sharing.

 

Presenting Faculty


Matthew W. State MD, PhD, University of California, San Francisco

Matthew W. State MD, PhD, is a child psychiatrist and human geneticist studying pediatric neuropsychiatric syndromes. He focuses on gene discovery as a launching point for efforts to illuminate the biology of these conditions and to develop novel and more effective therapies. Dr. State received his undergraduate and medical degrees at Stanford University, completed his residency in psychiatry and fellowship in child psychiatry at UCLA’s Neuropsychiatric Institute, and earned a PhD in genetics from Yale University. He is currently the Oberndorf Family Distinguished Professor and Chair of Psychiatry at UCSF and Director of the Langley Porter Psychiatric Institute and Hospital.

 


Jan Willemse, AIA, LEED AP, ZGF Architects

Jan Willemse serves as a managing partner at ZGF and leads design teams on a variety of complex buildings. His approach focuses on synthesizing art and science, infused with a strong sense of social responsibility and resource stewardship. He’s responsible for advancing the firm’s Integrated Project Delivery approach and use of digital design tools. His projects range from children’s hospitals to research buildings, and from sports medicine facilities to a net-zero energy innovation center. Jan has designed clinical facilities at academic medical institutions, including Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center; Stanford University; Oregon Health & Science University; and the University of Minnesota.