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Insights & Solutions

Blog
April 2015 Blog

Hospital-acquired infections (HAI) and other easily transmittable diseases are a serious concern in most facilities today. Implementing some of the latest best practices in your physical environment can help to minimize their impact—and help you get the best outcomes from your efforts. When exploring design options that can help to prevent HAI and keep other infectious diseases from spreading, here are three key factors to consider:

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Interview
February 2015 Interview

Learn about: the key issues facing healthcare administration as a result of healthcare reform, forward-thinking strategies to manage the challenges associated with healthcare reform and the ways healthcare architects and designers can help envision future healthcare enterprises.

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Interview
October 2014 Interview

Learn about: the key noise issues facing the industry today, design strategies that can be implemented to mitigate noise, the problems with spaces that are too quiet.

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Interview
March 2016 Interview

Learn about: the ways technology, design, and healthcare operations should work together, designing for future technologies, and the importance of creating interdisciplinary teams when integrating technology into healthcare spaces.

Blog
November 2014 Blog
In the ongoing battle to reduce noise in hospital patient units, much attention has been paid to the floor and the ceiling. Over the years, several case studies have shown that sound-absorbing ceiling tile and carpet can help significantly reduce excess noise on a unit. But what about the walls?
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Interview
October 2014 Interview

Learn about: why hospitals starting to care more about noise issues, new metrics for noise measurements and why measuring noise in unoccupied rooms is important and holistic approaches to sound reduction.

Blog
October 2014 Blog

The issue of excessive noise in healthcare facilities is indeed complicated. Patients need a calm, peaceful environment in which to heal, and loud noises certainly are at odds with that concept. While architectural and design choices can be made to lower the general noise level -- high-performance sound-absorbing materials in floors, ceilings, and walls are examples -- perhaps the most important and effective step a healthcare organization can take is to create a “culture of quiet” among its staff on all levels.

Blog
October 2014 Blog

For many years, carpet was considered a no-no for use in most hospital settings beyond waiting areas. The most oft-cited reason was cleanability, as well as a perceived added difficulty for caregivers pushing carts and other wheeled equipment. However, with the growing awareness of the noise issue in hospitals—including the potential financial repercussions, based on the HCAHPS system and the reimbursements tied to it—carpet is getting a second look in some facilities looking to decrease overall noise levels.

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Webinar
October 2014 Webinar
MASS Design Group is committed to stretching the boundaries of what we expect our built environment to provide. Architecture can restrict people’s access to essential services, but in the process of working on buildings as far afield as Rwanda, the Dominican Republic of the Congo, and Haiti, design and the process of building can also generate systematic change, break the cycle of poverty, and radically improve people’s health, livelihood s and lives. This session outlines the work, process, and opportunities through which architects and designers can apply their skills for impact.
EBD Journal Club
April 2014 EBD Journal Club

Shepley, M. M., Pasha, S., Ferguson, P., Huffcut, J. C., Kiyokawa, G., & Martere, J. (2013). Design research and behavioral health facilities. The Center for Health Design.