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Knowledge Repository

Effect of bar-code-assisted medication administration on medication error rates in an adult medical intensive care unit

Author(s): DeYoung, J. L., Vanderkooi, M. E., Barletta, J. F.

Adapting to Family-Centered Hospital Design: Changes in Providers’ Attitudes over a Two-Year Period

Author(s): France, D., Throop, P., Joers, B., Allen, L., Parekh, A., Rickard, D., Deshpande, J.
Although hospitals are being designed based on evidence-based design principles, it’s unclear how working in such an environment influences providers’ attitudes and professional performance.  
Key Point Summary

Hospital design and face-to-face interaction among clinicians: a theoretical model

Author(s): Rashid, M.
Current research focusing on collaboration between medical professionals has shown the importance of face-to-face interactions on patient and staff outcomes. However, most strategies for increasing these interactions among clinicians have focused on operational changes that are intended to facilitate a cultural change within the organization. This research looks to examine how the physical design of a healthcare facility can create opportunities for face-to-face interactions between clinicians through spatial programs and structure.
Key Point Summary

Why do patients in acute care hospitals fall? Can falls be prevented?

Author(s): Dykes, P. C., Carroll, D. L., Hurley, A. C., Benoit, A., Middleton, B.
Despite a large quantitative evidence base for guiding fall risk assessment and not needing highly technical, scarce, or expensive equipment to prevent falls, falls are serious problems in hospitals.
Key Point Summary

The Effect of Environmental Design on Reducing Nursing Errors and Increasing Efficiency in Acute Care Settings: A Review and Analysis of the Literature

Author(s): Chaudhury, H., Mahmood, A., Valente, M.
In acute care settings, the physical environment plays an important role in staff efficiency and patient safety. Some research suggests that poor environments can result in staff stress, anxiety, and distractions due to noise; artificial lighting; improper or inadequate ventilation; and disorienting layouts of nursing units. There is less research on how environmental factors affect nursing staff health, effectiveness, errors, and job satisfaction. 
Key Point Summary

Using a Task Analysis to Describe Nursing Work in Acute Care Patient Environments

Author(s): Battisto, D., Pak, R., Vander Wood, M. A., Pilcher, J. J.
A growing body of research demonstrates linkages between workplace design and processes in healthcare facilities with staff and patient safety, operational efficiency, staff satisfaction, and medical errors. There has been less emphasis on the role of the built environment in helping or hindering care delivery. Research is needed on the contextualized activities performed by nurses and how nurses spend their time to measure the effects of interventions aimed at redesigning care to improve safety or efficiency or to understand the implications of policy changes for nursing practice.
Key Point Summary

The impact of health facilities on healthcare workers’ well-being and performance

Author(s): Rechel, B., Buchan, J., McKee, M.
There is extensive research on the effect of healthcare environments on patients. But much less is known about health facilities’ impact the staff, even while there is growing recognition of the need for healthy working environments. Poor healthcare working environments can relate to the nature of the work—long and antisocial hours, little administrative support, physical labor, and, sometimes, violence. 
Key Point Summary

Interruptions and Geographic Challenges to Nurses' Cognitive Workload

Author(s): Redding, D., Robinson, S.
Inpatient care is fast-paced and requires nurses to constantly shift their attention to make clinical decisions and care for patients in a constantly environment. Nurses integrate complex thinking with psychomotor and affective skills to deliver interventions. This thinking is continually disrupted by interruptions and distractions, which compete for their attention and can lead to errors or omissions and potentially pose a risk to patient safety.
Key Point Summary

Direct cellular vs. indirect pager communication during orthopaedic surgical procedures: A prospective study

Author(s): Ortega, G. R., Taksali, S., Smart, R., Baumgaertner, M. R.
Staff-to-staff communication is critical to quality and efficient healthcare. Physicians, nurses, and other healthcare workers all use various methods of communication in their daily work. Difficulties in staff communication often lead to interruptions and delays in patient care, variation in response time, medical errors, violation of privacy, and dissatisfaction in patient and staff.
Key Point Summary

A Pod Design for Nursing Assignments

Author(s): Donahue, L.
The Transforming Care at the Bedside (TCAB) Initiative affects four focus areas: patient-centered care, teamwork and vitality, value-added processes, and safe and reliable care. University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) Shadyside began participating in TCAB 2003.
Key Point Summary