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Knowledge Repository

Quiet Time in a Pediatric Medical/Surgical Setting

Author(s): Cranmer, K., Davenport, L.
Despite being places for rest and healing, hospitals often are noisy places. These rising sound levels can be harmful and stressful for patients, caregivers, and staff, as well as contribute to an unsatisfactory environment in which to work and heal. In response, some intensive care units now have quiet time to reduce noise levels. However, little is known about the benefits of quiet time in a pediatric medical–surgical setting.
Key Point Summary
Added January 2014

Review of the Literature: Acuity-Adaptable Patient Room

Author(s): Bonuel, N. , Cesario, S.
Acuity-adaptable rooms allow patients to stay in one room from the time they are admitted to when they leave, regardless of their acuity level. These specially equipped private rooms are staffed by nurses who have the skills and training to support the complete range of care for patients with similar conditions or disease processes. The rooms are larger in size than a regular hospital room to accommodate various patients’ needs as their condition changes, such as critical care equipment, additional staff, procedures, and family members.
Key Point Summary
Added March 2014

Pilot cluster randomised controlled trial of flooring to reduce injuries from falls in wards for older people.

Author(s): Drahota, A. K., Ward, D., Udell, J. E., Soilemezi, D., Ogollah, R., Higgins, B., Dean, T. P., Severs, M.
Inpatient falls are a major issue for hospitals and are associated with mortality, morbidity and financial costs. Falls are particularly prevalent in elderly care environments, where patients have more risk factors for both falls and injury. With an aging society, this is an issue of increasing concern.
Key Point Summary
Added November 2014

Patients’ Interactions in an Intensive Care Unit and Their Memories of Intensive Care: A Mixed Method Study

Author(s): Meriläinen, M, Kyngäs, H, Ala-Kokko, T
The various equipment and devices in the intensive care unit (ICU) make it the most technologically sophisticated environment in any hospital. But, from a patient’s perspective, being connected to various devices; experiencing unsettling noises, smells, lighting, and uncomfortable temperatures; and enduring the perceptions of other patients as care objects can cause both physical and mental stress.
Key Point Summary
Added January 2014

Experiences of the transplant nurses caring for renal transplant Patients in an acuity-adaptable patient room

Author(s): Bonuel, N., Cesario, S. K.
One benefit of acuity-adaptable patient rooms may be increased job satisfaction for nurses. Further, making nurses happier at their jobs could keep them in the workforce longer. This article examines this patient care model from the perspective of renal transplant nurses.
Key Point Summary
Added March 2014

Life Safety Code Comparison

Author(s): Crowley, M. A., Harper, J. E.
Added May 2014

Utilizing Integrated Facility Design to Improve the Quality of a Pediatric Ambulatory Surgery Center

Author(s): Pelly, N., Zeallear, B., B., Reed, M., Martin, L.
Integrated Facility Design (IFD) comes from the Toyota 3P (Production, Preparation, Process) program used to reduce initial cost, while accelerating development time.
Key Point Summary
Added May 2014

Understanding the Role of Hospital Design on the Psychological Trauma of Hospitalization for Children

Author(s): Cartland, J.
The Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago (formerly, Children’s Memorial Hospital) has gone through many transformations since its founding in a small North Side cottage 130 years ago. Lurie Children’s recently executed one of the most significant transformations in its history. It moved into a replacement facility, leaving its historic home in the Lincoln Park neighborhood of Chicago and moving near its academic partner, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, in the Streeterville neighborhood.
Key Point Summary
Added June 2014

The Work of Adult and Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Nurses

Author(s): Douglas,. S., Cartmill, T., Brown, R., Hoonakker, P., Slagle, J., Van Roy, K. S, Walker, J, M.
Over the years, researchers have employed a variety of methods to describe and quantify nursing work. However, much of this research looked at nursing in general care settings and not at the unique work nurses perform in intensive care units (ICUs). This study uses behavioral task analysis to observe activities performed by adult ICU (AICU) and pediatric ICU (PICU) nurses as well as to compare the time they spent on various tasks across four different ICUs.
Key Point Summary
Added January 2014

Research note: Physical Activity in Pediatric Healing Gardens

Author(s): Pasha, S., Shepley, M., M.
Research has shown that frequency and duration of garden use within urban and hospital settings can be hindered through barriers such as uncomfortable seating and lack of shade. However, once barriers like these are removed, it is unknown if an increase in frequency and duration of garden use has an impact on the level of physical activity during garden visitation.
Key Point Summary
Added May 2014