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Knowledge Repository

Physical Environment: The Major Determinant Towards the Creation of a Healing Environment?

Author(s): Abbas, M. Y., Ghazali, R.,
Prior research suggests that the pediatric population’s heightened perception of the quality of the physical environment can have an impact on the creation of a healing environment.
Key Point Summary

Dementia Care Redesigned: Effects of Small-Scale Living Facilities on Residents, Their Family Caregivers, and Staff

Author(s): Verbeek, H., Zwakhalen, S. M. G., van Rossum, E., Ambergen, T., Kempen, G., Hamers, J. P. H.
Small-scale environments are increasing in popularity for the care of dementia patients. This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of this strategy. 
Key Point Summary

Impact of Place of Residence on Relationship Between Quality of Life and Cognitive Decline in Dementia

Author(s): Missotten, P., Thomas, P., Squelard, G., Di Notte, D., Fontaine, O., Paquay, L., De Lepeleire, J., Buntinx, F., Ylieff, M.

Neighborhood built environment and income: Examining multiple health outcomes

Author(s): Sallis, J. F., Saelens, B. E., Frank, L. D., Conway, T. L., Slymen, D. J., Cain, K. L., Chapman, J. E., Kerr, J.

Scheduled Medications and Falls in Dementia Patients Utilizing a Wander Garden

Author(s): Detweiler, M. B., Murphy, P. F., Kim, K. , Myers, L. , Ashai, A.
Among dementia residents, fall risk is often compounded by the side effects of the medications routinely used to treat comorbid medical issues, in addition to treating concurrent depression, agitation, psychosis, anxiety, and insomnia. Of all the types of medications involved in increased fall risk, psychotropic medications have been identified as having the highest risk. Studies suggest that dementia patients using a wander garden may have decreased indices of agitation and reduced use of as-needed (pro re nata [PRN]) medications. In addition, the wander garden has been reported to be a positive environmental intervention to reduce falls in residents with dementia. 
Key Point Summary

Using evidence-based environmental design to enhance safety and quality.

Author(s): Sadler, B., Joseph, A., Keller, A., Rostenberg, B.

Improving the quality of healthcare through facility design

Author(s): Cardon, K.

The relationship between destination proximity, destination mix and physical activity behaviors

Author(s): McCormack, G. R., Giles-Corti, B., Bulsara, M.

Relationships between street characteristics and perceived attractiveness for walking reported by elderly people

Author(s): Borst, H. C., Miedema, H. M. E., de Vries, S. I., Graham, J. M. A., van Dongen, J. E. F.

Effects of indoor gardening on sleep, agitation, and cognition in dementia patients - A pilot study

Author(s): Lee, Y., Kim, S.
Pharmacological intervention including sedative hypnotics and neuroleptics is a common treatment for sleep and behavioral problems in dementia. However, the high risk of adverse effects of those drugs indicates that non-pharmacological interventions are needed as well.  Among those non-pharmacological interventions physical activity is one approach that influences the circadian timing system and was suggested to be effective for sleep and behavioral disturbances of dementia patients. In addition, the positive effects of physical activities, especially exercise, on cognition were suggested. 
Key Point Summary