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Knowledge Repository

Developing a multi-systemic fall prevention model, incorporating the physical environment, the care process and technology: A systematic review

Author(s): Choi, Y.-S., Lawler, E., Boenecke, C. A., Ponatoski, E. R., Zimring, C. M.
Falls are the most frequently reported negative events in hospitals in the United States and other countries, and about one-third of them result in injury of some type. Injury from falls can result in increased hospital stays, increased costs and litigation, among other problems. The authors reviewed the literature on falls, fall injuries, fall risk factors, and interventions to better understand the effectiveness of different methods for fall prevention in hospital settings.
Key Point Summary

Standing on textured surfaces: effects on standing balance in healthy older adults

Author(s): Hatton, A. L., Dixon, J., Rome, K., Martin, D.

Finishes and Furnishings: Considerations for Critical Care Environments

Author(s): Chambers, M., Bowman, K. L.
Finishes and furnishings play an important role in the healing environment and do affect patient health outcomes, staff satisfaction, operational efficiency, and costs. It is important to create properly designed critical care units. Involving healthcare providers in the design process is necessary to highlight the user’s perspective, preferences, choices, and comfort versus safety.
Key Point Summary

In vitro evaluation of a novel process for reducing bacterial contamination of environmental surfaces

Author(s): Baxa, D., Shetron-Rama, L., Golembieski, M., Golembieski, M., Jain, S., Gordon, M., Zervos, M.

The role played by contaminated surfaces in the transmission of nosocomial pathogens

Author(s): Otter, J. A., Yezli, S., French, G. L.

Flexibility: beyond the buzzword-practical findings from a systematic literature review

Author(s): Carthy, J., Chow, V., Jung, Y-M., Mills, S.
While many healthcare facilities claim to have incorporated flexibility and adaptability into their new design, few have documented the outcomes of such claims. In reality, many healthcare facilities are outdated before they are built and fully occupied. These facilities then require extensive renovation and replacement during their life cycle to respond to changing demands of demographics, technology, and care delivery models. 
Key Point Summary

Physical Environment: The Major Determinant Towards the Creation of a Healing Environment?

Author(s): Abbas, M. Y., Ghazali, R.,
Prior research suggests that the pediatric population’s heightened perception of the quality of the physical environment can have an impact on the creation of a healing environment.
Key Point Summary

Converting Medical/Surgical Units for Safe Use by Psychiatric Patients: The Physical and Fiscal Risks

Author(s): Hunt, J. M., Sine, D. M.
When repurposing medical/surgical units as behavioral health units, there are a significant number of elements within the physical environment that must be modified to support the specialized needs of the patients and reduce the risk of self-harm and harm to others. While intention for self-harm cannot be reliably assessed, suicide is a major concern on psychiatric units, and therefore there is a need to design the unit as if all patients may be at risk for self-harm. 
Key Point Summary

Nurses’ Perceptions of How physical Environment Affects Medication Errors in Acute Care Settings

Author(s): Mahmood, A., Chaudhury, H., Valente, M.
Medication errors in hospitals occur for a number of reasons, stemming from staff and organizational issues to aspects of the physical environment. Errors include omissions, giving the wrong type or amount of medication, and giving the wrong patient unneeded medication. Research has indicated that a significant amount of these errors are avoidable.   
Key Point Summary

The sickening rug: A repeating static pattern that leads to motion-sickness like symptoms

Author(s): Bonato, F., Bubka, A., Graveline, V.
Flooring is a prominent component of hospital design, with surprisingly little research on the subject. An issue that has not been researched is the impact of patterns on health and perception related issues. This paper undertakes a simulated exercise on the impact of viewing specific patterns on motion-sickness like symptons. Although there is some research on the impact of visual patterns on epilepsy patients, the effect on people without neurological disorders has not been explored.
Key Point Summary