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Knowledge Repository

A quasi-experimental evaluation of compliant flooring in a residential care setting

Author(s): Gustavsson, J., Bonander, C., Nilson, F.

The Architecture Of Safety: An Emerging Priority For Improving Patient Safety

Author(s): Joseph, A., Henriksen, K., Malone, E.

Compliant flooring to prevent fall-related injuries in older adults: A scoping review of biomechanical efficacy, clinical effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and workplace safety

Author(s): Lachance, C. C., Jurkowski, M. P., Dymarz, A. C., Robinovitch, S. N., Feldman, F., Laing, A. C., Mackey, D. C., Tranah, G.
Compliant flooring may be broadly defined as any floor covering or flooring system with some degree of shock absorbency. Numerous previous studies have shown that different forms of compliant flooring can reduce the severity and incidence of fall-related injuries in older adult patients.
Key Point Summary

The design and initial evaluation of visual cues in carpets to assist walking

Author(s): McNeil, S. J., Tapp, L. S.
One way to reduce the occurrence of indoor falls for both elderly people and other individuals is to improve the design of floor coverings so that they can help create a safer walking environment. A growing number of studies are showing that the design of products such as carpets can specifically help older people lead more productive and independent lives by empowering them through safer opportunities for mobility.
Key Point Summary

Impact of the Physical Environment of Residential Health, Care, and Support Facilities (RHCSF) on Staff and Residents A Systematic Review of the Literature

Author(s): Joseph, A., Choi, Y.-S., Quan, X.
Strategies related to the design of the built environment should be considered within the context of the culture of the organization and the resident population. This study of the physical environment of residential health, care, and support facilities addresses the range of settings and population, where other studies have been lacking. The literature review strongly suggests that the built environment is an important component of care provided in residential care settings.
Key Point Summary

Effects of Compliant Flooring Systems and Resident Weight on Hand Forces When Pushing Floor-Based Lifts and Wheelchairs among Long-Term Care Staff

Author(s): Lachance, C. C., Korall, A. M. B., Russell, C. M., Johnson, S. I., Feldman, F., Robinovitch, S. N., Mackey, D. C.

Exploring Perceptions of Designers and Medical Staff in South Korea about Design Elements for the Elder-Friendly Hospital

Author(s): Kim, D., Lee, J. H., Ha, M.
The elderly population is growing around the world and so is the geriatric patient population. The authors indicate that despite the fact that the elderly will soon be the primary users of healthcare services, healthcare facilities are not designed for the elderly. In this study, designers and medical staff were asked to rate the importance of 33 design elements in the context of an elder-friendly hospital.
Key Point Summary

The Geriatric ED: Structure, Patient Care, and Considerations for the Emergency Department Geriatric Unit

Author(s): Burton, J. H., Young, J., Bernier, C. A.
Older patients who visit the emergency department in developed countries are more likely to require a more specialized nature of treatment in comparison to younger patients. The authors believe that current-day emergency departments are not equipped to adequately treat these patients in terms of design and staff training for assessments and evaluations unique to this age group. The authors recommend a geriatric-specific approach to designing patient treatment spaces, medical evaluations, neurocognitive assessments, and post-ED visit support.
Key Point Summary

Home Modification and Prevention of Frailty Progression in Older Adults: A Japanese Prospective Cohort Study

Author(s): Mitoku, K., Shimanouchi, S.
In a study involving 574 Japanese adults 65 years or older who required a low or moderate level of care, 34% modified their homes over the course of the study.  Modification of these older adults’ homes prevented the progression of frailty (requiring higher level of care).
Key Point Summary

Cost–utility analysis of a shock-absorbing floor intervention to prevent injuries from falls in hospital wards for older people

Author(s): Latimer, N., Dixon, S., Drahota, A. K., Severs, M.