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Knowledge Repository

Ergonomical aspects of anaesthetic practice

Author(s): Raghavendra, R.S.
Anesthesiologists typically act as data analyzers, investigators, and planners for forthcoming surgical events, but only after patients and their families have been convinced that the procedure is appropriate. With the field of anesthesiology rapidly developing, it is imperative that workstations are optimized so that procedures can be conducted efficiently and safely. Ergonomics is defined as a discipline that explores and applies information regarding human characteristics, requirements, limitations, and abilities to the development, design, engineering, and testing of equipment, systems, and occupations.
Key Point Summary

Impact of the Physical Environment of Residential Health, Care, and Support Facilities (RHCSF) on Staff and Residents A Systematic Review of the Literature

Author(s): Joseph, A., Choi, Y.-S., Quan, X.
Strategies related to the design of the built environment should be considered within the context of the culture of the organization and the resident population. This study of the physical environment of residential health, care, and support facilities addresses the range of settings and population, where other studies have been lacking. The literature review strongly suggests that the built environment is an important component of care provided in residential care settings.
Key Point Summary

Part 1: Evidence-Based Facility Design Using Transforming Care at the Bedside Principles

Author(s): Devine, D. A., Wenger, B., Krugman, M., Zwink, J. E., Shiskowsky, K., Hagman, J., Limon, S., Sanders, C., Reeves, C.
A western academic hospital reexamined its design strategy when after three years of building a new facility they had to plan for a new facility to meet their patient capacity. Using a combination of the principles of Transforming Care at the Bedside (TCAB) and Evidence-Based Design (EBD), an interdisciplinary team presented design recommendations.
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Benefits from wood interior in a hospital room: a preference study

Author(s): Nyrud, A. Q., Bringslimark, T., Bysheim, K.
New design strategies, focusing on implementing the psychologically beneficial effects of nature in the built environment, are increasingly being implemented in building design. The design of built settings is of particular importance in environments intended for healing, such as hospitals. Preferences for a setting are thought to be indicators of factors in the environment that can enhance...
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Factors influencing evaluation of patient areas, work spaces, and staff areas by healthcare professionals

Author(s): Sadatsafavi, H., Walewski, J., Shepley, M. M.
One important element of high-quality healthcare delivery is a motivated and satisfied staff. Healthcare executives should regularly examine the factors that influence clinicians’ perceptions of satisfaction and quality so that necessary changes can be addressed.
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Impact of the Design of Neonatal Intensive Care Units on Neonates, Staff, and Families: A Systematic Literature Review

Author(s): Shahheidari, M., Homer, C.
The authors indicate that the design of NICUs incorporating single family rooms as evidence indicates this room type contributes to the better development of babies, facilitates increased parental involvement in care, controls infection, and reduces noise and length of stay. 
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Flexibility: beyond the buzzword-practical findings from a systematic literature review

Author(s): Carthy, J., Chow, V., Jung, Y-M., Mills, S.
While many healthcare facilities claim to have incorporated flexibility and adaptability into their new design, few have documented the outcomes of such claims. In reality, many healthcare facilities are outdated before they are built and fully occupied. These facilities then require extensive renovation and replacement during their life cycle to respond to changing demands of demographics, technology, and care delivery models. 
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Nurses’ Perceptions of How physical Environment Affects Medication Errors in Acute Care Settings

Author(s): Mahmood, A., Chaudhury, H., Valente, M.
Medication errors in hospitals occur for a number of reasons, stemming from staff and organizational issues to aspects of the physical environment. Errors include omissions, giving the wrong type or amount of medication, and giving the wrong patient unneeded medication. Research has indicated that a significant amount of these errors are avoidable.   
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Healthcare Environmental Terms and Outcome Measures: An Evidence-based Design Glossary

Author(s): Quan, X., Malone, E., Joseph, A., Pati, D.

Noise in the Operating Room—What Do We Know? A Review of the Literature

Author(s): Hasfeldt, D., Laerkner, E., Birkelund, R.
Noise is a general stressor and should be avoided in the operating room (OR). However, over the last 10 years, while the focus has been on preventing air pollution and maximizing sterility in the OR, very little attention has gone toward preventing noise pollution. Meanwhile, there is more and more noisy technological equipment in the OR, and it can be assumed that problems with noise in the OR have not decreased.
Key Point Summary