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Knowledge Repository

Anticipated Advantages and Disadvantages of a move to 100% Single Room Hospital in Australia: A Case Study

Author(s): Cusack, L., Wiechula, R., Schultz, T., Dollard, J., Maben, J.

Does a new spatial design in psychiatric inpatient care influence patients’ and staff’s perception of their care/working environment? A study protocol of a pilot study using a single-system experimental design

Author(s): Lindgren, B.-M., Molin, J., Lundström, M., Strömbäck, M., Renberg, E. S., Ringnér, A,.

Mental and behavioral health settings: Importance & effectiveness of environmental qualities & features as perceived by staff

Author(s): Shepley, M. M., Watson, A., Pitts, F., Garrity, A., Spelman, E., Fronsman, A., Kelkar, J.
While many previous studies have examined how facility designs can benefit patients within non-psychiatric acute care settings, there is a lack of research exploring how physical environments can be better suited to promote the health of patients in mental and behavioral health (MBH) facilities.
Key Point Summary

Design in mind: eliciting service user and frontline staff perspectives on psychiatric ward design through participatory methods

Author(s): Csipke, E., Papoulias, C., Vitoratou, S., Williams, P., Rose, D., Wykes, T.
Previous studies have shown repeatedly that the physical design of psychiatric wards has a significant impact on patient recovery and well-being. It has also been found that staff and patients often express conflicting expectations regarding the design of psychiatric wards. Therefore, it is important to better understand different stakeholder perceptions of the same environment so that the most effective design decisions can be made. One possible way of doing this would be using the “SURE model,” which is a participatory method involving collaborations with service users during all stages of the study.
Key Point Summary

The Physical and Psychosocial Environment’s Influence on Patients’ and Staff’s Perceptions of Person-Centered Care in Forensic Psychiatry

Author(s): Alexiou, E., Degl'Innocenti, A., Kullgren, A., Falk, H., Wijk, H.

Low stimulus environments: reducing noise levels in continuing care

Author(s): Brown, J., Fawzi, W., Shah, A., Joyce, M., Holt, G., McCarthy, C., Stevenson, C., Marange, R., Shakes, J., Solomon-Ayeh, K.
This article highlights a project that aimed to reduce levels of intrinsic background noise on an adult mental health ward. Following intervention, the ward was able to decrease the background noise decibel level from 60dB to 53dB (on average).
Key Point Summary

Mental and Behavioral Health Environments: Critical Considerations for Facility Design

Author(s): Shepley, M. M., Watson, A., Pitts, F., Garrity, A., Spelman, E., Kelkar, J., Fronsman, A.
​Mental and behavioral health (MBH) facilities are being built and renovated at an increasing rate, but research concerning best building practices has not kept pace with construction. Evidence-based design (EBD) involves the use of research to help multidisciplinary design teams create the most appropriate built environments. 
Key Point Summary

An Assessment of Levels of Safety in Psychiatric Units

Author(s): Bayramzadeh, S.
As mental treatment facilities see increases in the number of patients seeking care, facilities face mounting pressure in their attempts to promote patient well-being and safety. The author suggests that there is a lack of systematic empirical studies that examine how the design of mental healthcare facilities contributes to patient care and safety.
Key Point Summary

Finding privacy from a public death: A qualitative exploration of how a dedicated space for end-of-life care in an acute hospital impacts on dying patients and their families

Author(s): Slatyer, S., Pienaar, C., Williams, A. M., Proctor, K., Hewitt, L.
Seriously ill patients die in hospitals around the world, and previous studies have shown that the factors that constitute a “good death” from the perspective of patients include control, comfort, family inclusion, sensitive communication, and peace. The quality of care provided to dying patients affects not only the patients, but bereaved families as well. It is therefore important for hospital environments to carefully consider the resources they provide towards quality end-of-life care.
Key Point Summary

The role of noise in clinical environments with particular reference to mental health care: A narrative review

Author(s): Brown, B., Rutherford, P., Crawford, P.
The problem of noise in healthcare environments has been discussed in a variety of contexts, including psychology, sociology, built environment studies, and nursing. It has been well documented that the element of noise within clinical settings can elevate stress, impede recovery, and disturb sleep. But despite the extensive literature discussing the effects of noise in clinical settings, scarcely any research has been done on the role noise plays in mental healthcare environments.
Key Point Summary