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Knowledge Repository

A complete, user-friendly database of healthcare design research references MoreLess about the Knowledge Repository

The Knowledge Repository is a complete, user-friendly database of healthcare design research references that continues to grow with the latest peer-reviewed publications. Start with our Knowledge Repository for all of your searches for articles and research citations on healthcare design topics. Access full texts through the source link, read key point summaries, or watch slidecasts. Expand your search and find project briefs, interviews, and other relevant resources by visiting our Insights & Solutions page.

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Displaying 241 - 260 of 472

Multisensory Stimulation to Improve Functional Performance in Moderate to Severe Dementia—Interim Results

Author(s): Collier, L., McPherson, K., Ellis-Hill, C., Staal, J., Bucks, R.
One of the innovative interventions for dementia care is the use of multisensory environments (MSEs). It is designed to stimulate senses, providing an activity-based intervention and is argued to address imbalance in sensory stimulation by pacing sensory-stimulating activity with sensory-calming activity. This sensory pacing may assist people with dementia in coping with confusion and behavior changes that are the consequences of this progressive, debilitating illness. However, the value of MSEs for people with dementia has yet to be established. Therefore, this study aimed to explore to what extent the sensory components of MSEs influence functional performance in people with moderate to severe dementia.
Key Point Summary
Added May 2014

Perceptions of the Physical Environment, Stage of Change for Physical Activity, and Walking Among Australian Adults

Author(s): Carnegie, M. A., Bauman, A., Marshall, A. L., Mohsin, M., Westley-Wise, V., Booth, M. L.
The health benefits of regular physical activity are well-established. An understanding of the factors that influence physical activity behaviors is greatly needed to influence sedentary population groups to become more physically active. Psychological, physiological, demographic, and environmental factors are known to influence physical activity. The increasing interest in physical environmental factors such as pleasant walking paths away from traffic, bike paths, weather conditions, and neighborhood safety has arisen due to broader, integrated models developed to more comprehensively explain physical activity behavior.
Key Point Summary
Added May 2014

Physical Restraint Initiation in Nursing Homes and Subsequent Resident Health

Author(s): Engberg, J., Castle, N. G., McCaffrey, D.
Previous studies have shown that restraint use may be associated with mental health problems, including increased social isolation and decreased cognitive function. Social isolation negatively affects the health of elders. Facilities with restrained residents also have poor restraint-management practices. Two other well-known consequences of immobility are pressure ulcers and contractures. Pressure ulcers affect both the comfort and the medical outcomes of nursing home residents with impaired mobility.
Key Point Summary
Added May 2014

Traffic Flow in the Operating Room: An Explorative and Descriptive Study on Air Quality During Orthopedic Trauma Implant Surgery

Author(s): Andersson, A.E., Bergh, I., Karlsson, J., Eriksson, B.I. MD, Nilsson,K.
Three main strategies exist to prevent surgical site infections following surgery: 1) the patient, 2) the surgical technique, 3) the surgical environment. This study focuses on optimizing the effect of the surgical environment in preventing SSIs (surgical site infections). The authors attempt to understand that the protective potential of operating room (OR) ventilation under different conditions is crucial to optimizing the surgical environment.
Key Point Summary
Added April 2014

Increased Light Exposure Consolidates Sleep and Strengthens Circadian Rhythms in Severe Alzheimer's Disease Patients Increased Light Exposure Consolidates Sleep and Strengthens Circadian Rhythms in Severe Alzheimer's Disease Patients

Author(s): Ancoli-Israel, S., Gehrman, P., Martin, J. L., Shochat, T., Marler, M., Corey-Bloom, J., Levi, L.
Studies with examined levels of illumination in adults have shown that the average level and the average amount of bright light exposure is lower in the elderly compared to younger adults, particularly in patients who are institutionalized with dementia. Although insufficient light exposure has been implied as a cause of sleep fragmentation, until recently there had been little direct evidence for this correlation. A recent study suggested that daytime light exposure impacts both nighttime sleep consolidation and timing of peak activity level (Shochat et al., 2000). In an attempt to improve sleep in nursing home patients, the current laboratory study exposed patients with mixed types of dementia to 2,500 lux for two hours a day for 10 days either in the morning or in the evening and tested the impact of the bright lighting on sleep and circadian rhythms.
Key Point Summary
Added April 2014

Promoting physical activity in rural communities: Walking trail access, use, and effects

Author(s): Brownson, R. C., Housemann, R. A., Brown, D. R., Jackson-Thompson, J, King, A. C., Malone, B. R., Sallis, J. F.
The health benefits of physical activity are well established. Physical activity contributes to a lower risk of coronary heart disease, as well as a variety of other chronic diseases including hypertension, non-insulin-dependent diabetes (Type 2), osteoarthritis, and osteoporosis. To promote physical activity, more environmental and policy strategies are needed. Examples of environmental and policy approaches to increase physical activity include walking and bicycle trails, liability legislation, zoning and land use, mall walking programs, building construction that encourages physical activity, policies and incentives promoting physical activity during the workday, and policies requiring comprehensive school physical health education programs.
Key Point Summary
Added April 2014

Impact of Music Therapy Interventions (Listening, Composition, Orff-Based) on the Physiological and Psychosocial Behaviors of Hospitalized Children: A Feasibility Study

Author(s): Colwell, C. M., Edwards, R., Hernandez, E., Brees, K.
The hospital experience can impact the physical and mental health of a child. Prior research has shown that music therapy can have a positive effect on mood, anxiety, respiratory distress, and behavioral distress. And although listening to music is the most common form of music therapy, songwriting and physically making music have also been used as a positive coping strategy for children within a hospital environment.
Key Point Summary
Added April 2014

Physical Environment: The Major Determinant Towards the Creation of a Healing Environment?

Author(s): Abbas, M. Y., Ghazali, R.,
Prior research suggests that the pediatric population’s heightened perception of the quality of the physical environment can have an impact on the creation of a healing environment.
Key Point Summary
Added April 2014

Considering the impact of medicine label design characteristics on patient safety

Author(s): Hellier, E. , Edworthy, J. , Derbyshire, N. , Costello, A.
The premise of this study is that there is sufficient evidence-based research in areas such as food labeling, chemical labeling, and general warnings that provides systematic evidence on the effects of medication label design characteristics such as font size, color, use of specific language and signal words/warnings on performance behavioral variables such as safety, compliance, understandability, and discriminability.
Key Point Summary
Added April 2014

Quality Physical Environment in Paediatric Wards: Designer’s Creation Versus Users’ Satisfaction

Author(s): Ghazali, R., Abbas, M. Y.
Prior research has revealed that an optimal healing environment can enhance a child’s quality of life by supporting the healing process. However, little has been done to identify specific design features within an optimal healing environment that either impede or aid the healing process.
Key Point Summary
Added April 2014

The Effect of Environmental Design on Reducing Nursing Errors and Increasing Efficiency in Acute Care Settings: A Review and Analysis of the Literature

Author(s): Chaudhury, H., Mahmood, A., Valente, M.
In acute care settings, the physical environment plays an important role in staff efficiency and patient safety. Some research suggests that poor environments can result in staff stress, anxiety, and distractions due to noise; artificial lighting; improper or inadequate ventilation; and disorienting layouts of nursing units. There is less research on how environmental factors affect nursing staff health, effectiveness, errors, and job satisfaction.
Key Point Summary
Added April 2014

Enhancing the traditional hospital design process: a focus on patient safety

Author(s): Reiling, J.G., Knutzen, B.L., Wallen, T.K., McCullough, S. , Miller, R., Chernos, S.
The current study is an overview of innovative system engineering and patient safety factors, named as the Synergy model that a hospital system utilized to design their new facility.
Key Point Summary
Added April 2014

Noise and related events in neonatal intensive care unit

Author(s): Chang, Y. J., Lin, C. H., Lin, L. H.
Noise contributes to environmental stress to premature infants, who often spend long periods of time in neonatal intensive care units (NICU). Some research indicates that noise contributes to higher incidences of hearing loss, as well as cardiovascular, respirator, endocrine, and behavioral deficits. Some of the noise might be reduced by studying different aspects of NICU settings (i.e., wards, personnel, equipment, and procedures).
Key Point Summary
Added April 2014

Noise Levels in an Urban Hospital and Workers' Subjective Responses

Author(s): Bayo, M. V., Garcia, A. M., Armando, G.
Noise has become a major environmental problem as well as a public health concern, resulting in a wide range of negative consequences. Despite healthcare facilities’ attempts to foster favorable environments to assist in patient recovery and staff working conditions, noise levels are often higher than desirable in and around hospitals. There is a need to identify the main noisy areas and noise sources and evaluate the hospital staff’s reactions to noise.
Key Point Summary
Added April 2014

Patient Satisfaction in Women’s Clinics Versus Traditional Primary Care Clinics in the Veterans Administration

Author(s): Bean-Mayberry, B., Chang, C-C., McNeil, M., Whittle, J., Hayes, P., Hudson Scholle, S.
Female patients are more satisfied with the care they receive at women’s clinics (WCs) than traditional primary care clinics (TCs). This study is important because the data collected indicate that female patients are more satisfied in WCs than in TCs, regardless of age and race.
Key Point Summary
Added March 2014

Wayfinding in an Unfamiliar Environment: Different Spatial Settings of Two Polyclinics

Author(s): Baskaya, A., Wilson, C., Ozcan, Y. Z.
People in healthcare facilities should be able to find their way easily through the structure. If they can’t, they experience stress. Symmetrical layouts, in which spaces with particular functions, for example waiting areas for a certain clinic, are distinguished in some way from other similar spaces, through the use of a landmark such as a particular color on the walls, are an effective design for a healthcare facility because they support accurate navigation through the building.
Key Point Summary
Added March 2014

Converting Medical/Surgical Units for Safe Use by Psychiatric Patients: The Physical and Fiscal Risks

Author(s): Hunt, J. M., Sine, D. M.
When repurposing medical/surgical units as behavioral health units, there are a significant number of elements within the physical environment that must be modified to support the specialized needs of the patients and reduce the risk of self-harm and harm to others. While intention for self-harm cannot be reliably assessed, suicide is a major concern on psychiatric units, and therefore there is a need to design the unit as if all patients may be at risk for self-harm.
Key Point Summary
Added March 2014

Clinical review: The impact of noise on patients’ sleep and the effectiveness of noise reduction strategies in intensive care units

Author(s): Xie, H., Kang, J., Mills, G. H.
The World Health Organization recommends that noise levels in hospitals stay below 30 dBA at night to allow for better rest, yet excessive noise is prevalent in many healthcare settings, including intensive care units (ICUs). Research indicates that, since the 1960s, noise levels in hospitals increased by an average of 0.38 dBA (day) and 0.42 dBA (night) per year. Other research reports that the noise level in ICUs ranges from 50 to 75 dBA, with a night peak level soaring to 103 dBA. It’s easy to see why sleep disturbance is common among these vulnerable patients.
Key Point Summary
Added February 2014

Servicescape: Physical environment of hospital pharmacies and hospital pharmacists’ work outcomes

Author(s): Lin, B.Y.-J., Leu, W.-J., Breen, G.-M., Lin, W.-H.
Researchers have studied the healthcare work environment from a number of angles, from an organizational behavior perspective honing in on motivation and reward, to an occupational and environmental perspective concerned with comfort and ergonomics, to a pathogenic perspective interested in exposure to disease. The idea of a “servicescape” has arisen in healthcare marketing to investigate the impact of the physical environment of service settings on employees’ psychological states and perceptions.
Key Point Summary
Added February 2014

Same-Handed and Mirrored Unit Configurations: Is There a Difference in Patient and Nurse Outcomes?

Author(s): Watkins, N., Kennedy, M., Ducharme, M., Padula, C.
Awareness of the impact of healthcare facility design on a number of diverse patient and staff outcomes is growing. From patient recovery time, satisfaction, and comfort to nursing staff efficiency, error rates, and distraction, varied outcomes are being linked to environmental conditions and design attributes in hospital settings. Inpatient unit configurations, specifically same-handed configurations vs. mirrored units, are a particular area of interest for researchers, with implications for practitioners and patient care. Same-handed configurations, which standardize all rooms within a unit such that they are all identical, may allow for reduced noise as headwalls are no longer shared.
Key Point Summary
Added February 2014