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Knowledge Repository

A complete, user-friendly database of healthcare design research references MoreLess about the Knowledge Repository

The Knowledge Repository is a complete, user-friendly database of healthcare design research references that continues to grow with the latest peer-reviewed publications. Start with our Knowledge Repository for all of your searches for articles and research citations on healthcare design topics. Access full texts through the source link, read key point summaries, or watch slidecasts. Expand your search and find project briefs, interviews, and other relevant resources by visiting our Insights & Solutions page.

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Displaying 261 - 280 of 472

Efficacy of controlling night-time noise and activities to improve patients’ sleep quality in a surgical intensive care unit

Author(s): Li, S., Wang, T., Wu, S. F. V., Liang, S., Tung, H.
In the intensive care unit (ICU), noises, continuous lighting, and constant care-related activities disrupt patients’ sleep. Patients also may struggle to sleep because they are in an unfamiliar environment, feel isolated, are in pain, have various tubes or other equipment to deal with, as well as just general treatment activities.
Key Point Summary
Added January 2014

Sound Spectral Analysis in the Intensive Care Nursery: Measuring High-Frequency Sound

Author(s): Kellam, B., Bhatia, J.
Little is known about how high-frequency, prolonged intense noise effects auditory development in preterm infants. However, some research indicates that premature infants who are exposed to persistent noise might experience some interference with their development of frequency discrimination and problems with sound-pattern recognition.
Key Point Summary
Added January 2014

Noise Levels in a General Surgical Ward: a descriptive study

Author(s): Christensen, M.
The noise levels in many UK hospitals exceed those recommended by the World Health Organization, yet are so prevalent that healthcare providers tend to think of them as just part of the working environment. However, current ward-based research is dated, perhaps indicating that the control of noise in these areas is perceived as insurmountable.
Key Point Summary
Added January 2014

Neonatal Response to Control of Noise Inside the Incubator

Author(s): Johnson, A. N.
Premature infants are at risk for long-term neurologic, cognitive, and behavioral problems. Therefore, supporting these medically fragile infants as they adapt to life outside the womb by decreasing possible environmental stressors, such as noise, is important. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Committee of Environmental Hazards recommends that neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) sound levels below 45 dB. Yet these babies are often in incubators, which are associated with higher sound levels from the equipment and surrounding environment.
Key Point Summary
Added January 2014

Nighttime Noise Issues That Interrupt Sleep After Cardiac Surgery

Author(s): Spence, J., Murray, T., Tang, A. S., Butler, R. S., Albert, N. M.
Hospital unit environments have excessive environmental ambient sound levels. In cardiac-surgical, general, and neonatal intensive care units, sound levels were commonly more than 50 dBand spiked to 80 dB and 100.9 dB. Common sounds associated with routine care in a postsurgical intermediate care unit have a decibel level in the range of heavy truck traffic (about 80 dB). Noise influences the physiological state of sleep. It is important to reduce nurse-generated and environmental noise when patients are trying to sleep.
Key Point Summary
Added January 2014

Mapping the Nursing Process: A New Approach for Understanding the Work of Nursing

Author(s): Potter, P., Grayson, D., Boxerman, S., Sledge, J., Wolf, L., Evanoff, B., Marshall, J.
Over the last 10 years, hospitals have tried to reconcile patients’ demands for high-quality, safe care along with payers’ demands for lower costs. As a result, many hospitals are looking for ways to streamline work processes, gain productivity, reduce costs, and maintain quality. Human factors engineering (HFE) techniques, drawn from the sciences of industrial engineering, ergonomics, and mathematics, have been used to analyze clinical care processes and restructure patient care delivery.
Key Point Summary
Added January 2014

Qualitative Analysis of Therapeutic Light Effects on Global Function in Alzheimer’s Disease

Author(s): Nowak, L., Davis, J.
The occurrence of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is growing, with 68% of cases occurring in women. In addition to declines in global function, patients with AD experience reversal of day–night patterns, disturbed sleep–wake rhythms, and excessive daytime sleepiness, making managing AD difficult. Symptom management includes pharmacologic measures, environmental or milieu management, and behavioral interventions.
Key Point Summary
Added January 2014

Direct observation of behavior: a review of current measures for use with older adults with dementia

Author(s): Curyto, K.J., Van Haitsma, K., Vriesman, D.K.
There are a number of methods to assess specific areas of behavior when evaluating changes in functioning, assessing the effects of an intervention, or measuring the effectiveness of a program of care. Some of these methods include: self-report, caregiver report, and family report of person-specific behaviors. However, self-reporting by dementia patients is often not reasonable given their cognitive decline and communication challenges. Ratings from other people can introduce measurement errors.
Key Point Summary
Added January 2014

The sound environment in an ICU patient room—a content analysis of sound levels and patient experiences

Author(s): Johansson, L., Bergbom, I., Wayeb, K. P., Ryherd, E., Lindahl, B.
This study was a prestudy for the planning and design of a larger one, where the aim is to investigate the relationship between sound (objective and subjective) and adult intensive care unit (ICU) delirium and/or other factors. It used sound measurement, behavioral observation, and interview methods. The results provide a good list of sound/noise impact on patients and subsequent ICU design considerations.
Key Point Summary
Added January 2014

Can modifications to the bedroom environment improve the sleep of new parents? Two randomized controlled trials

Author(s): Lee, K. A., Gay, C. L.
One of the major challenges of new parenthood is adjusting to the sleep disruption that comes with caring for a newborn. Parents-to-be know that caring for an infant with random sleep and feeding patterns will mean sleep deprivation and fatigue, but few are prepared for the actual physical and emotional demands.
Key Point Summary
Added January 2014

Person-Environment Interactions Contributing to Nursing Home Resident Falls

Author(s): Hill, E. E., Nguyen, T. H., Shaha, M., Wenzel, J. A., DeForge, B. R., Spellbring, A. M.
Falls are common for older adults, with significant consequences, including injuries and even death as well as healthcare costs. However, few studies have looked at environmental factors, such as lighting, equipment, and slippery floor surfaces, as potential risk factors for falls by nursing home residents. This study explores the risk factors associated with resident falls in a nursing home using a focus group.
Key Point Summary
Added January 2014

Noise in the Operating Room—What Do We Know? A Review of the Literature

Author(s): Hasfeldt, D., Laerkner, E., Birkelund, R.
Noise is a general stressor and should be avoided in the operating room (OR). However, over the last 10 years, while the focus has been on preventing air pollution and maximizing sterility in the OR, very little attention has gone toward preventing noise pollution. Meanwhile, there is more and more noisy technological equipment in the OR, and it can be assumed that problems with noise in the OR have not decreased.
Key Point Summary
Added January 2014

Patients’ Interactions in an Intensive Care Unit and Their Memories of Intensive Care: A Mixed Method Study

Author(s): Meriläinen, M, Kyngäs, H, Ala-Kokko, T
The various equipment and devices in the intensive care unit (ICU) make it the most technologically sophisticated environment in any hospital. But, from a patient’s perspective, being connected to various devices; experiencing unsettling noises, smells, lighting, and uncomfortable temperatures; and enduring the perceptions of other patients as care objects can cause both physical and mental stress.
Key Point Summary
Added January 2014

Bathing people with dementia: when education is not enough

Author(s): Gaspard, G., Cox, L.
Dementia is increasing at the rate of one case every 7 seconds. As such, the need for methods for caring for these patients with dignity also increases. Current research indicates that many people with dementia respond negatively to bathing, in part because they don’t feel comfortable being naked in front of other people or with unfamiliar bathing equipment, and may develop resistant behaviors.
Key Point Summary
Added January 2014

The Work of Adult and Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Nurses

Author(s): Douglas,. S., Cartmill, T., Brown, R., Hoonakker, P., Slagle, J., Van Roy, K. S, Walker, J, M.
Over the years, researchers have employed a variety of methods to describe and quantify nursing work. However, much of this research looked at nursing in general care settings and not at the unique work nurses perform in intensive care units (ICUs). This study uses behavioral task analysis to observe activities performed by adult ICU (AICU) and pediatric ICU (PICU) nurses as well as to compare the time they spent on various tasks across four different ICUs.
Key Point Summary
Added January 2014

Influence of nursing unit layout on staff communication and interaction patterns

Author(s): Dutta, R.
The quality and design of the built environment has acquired a very significant role in improving patient and staff satisfaction in terms of overall healthcare experience. There is evidence from health care and beyond that working in teams enhances an organization’s effectiveness, produce a better patient care both in terms of improving health delivery and staff motivation, and in superior patient outcomes. Communication among all team members of the groups is essential for the success of delivering healthcare services.
Key Point Summary
Added November 2012

Physical Environment and Job Satisfaction in a Community Mental Health Center.

Author(s): Folkins, C., O’Relly, C., Roberts, K., Miller, S.
Psychological evidence suggests that behavior is affected by situational and environmental settings. The health care satisfaction with physical environment contributes to overall job satisfaction of medical staff. Physical surroundings in a community mental health center may be a mediating variable for staff morale and effectiveness. Environmental effects could have dramatic implication for a mental health professionals who constantly must make decisions about patients on the basis of subjective impressions of appearance and behavior. The study deals with staff attitudes in the outpatient clinics of a community mental health center.
Key Point Summary
Added November 2012

Direct cellular vs. indirect pager communication during orthopaedic surgical procedures: A prospective study

Author(s): Ortega, G. R., Taksali, S., Smart, R., Baumgaertner, M. R.
Staff-to-staff communication is critical to quality and efficient healthcare. Physicians, nurses, and other healthcare workers all use various methods of communication in their daily work. Difficulties in staff communication often lead to interruptions and delays in patient care, variation in response time, medical errors, violation of privacy, and dissatisfaction in patient and staff.
Key Point Summary
Added October 2012

Predesign and Post-occupancy Analysis of Staff Behavior in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

Author(s): Shepley, M.M.
Advances in technology have resulted in an increase in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) population; allowing care for newborn babies who might have died in the absence of advanced medical care. The design of NICUs has therefore become an important concern in healthcare, and an ongoing debate is the merit of open bays over closed bays. s. Changes in design have a direct impact on staff experience, and potentially staff behavior, which in turn can impact patient care.
Key Point Summary
Added October 2012

Effects of different interior decorations in the seclusion area of a psychiatric acute ward

Author(s): Vaaler, A.E., Morken, G., Linaker, O.M.
Seclusion, or containment of a patient in an enclosed area, is a common practice in psychiatric acute wards. Traditionally such areas have been used for the dual purpose of meeting the safety and containment needs of behaviorally disturbed patients, and obtaining a decrease in sensory and emotional input (based on the belief that external stimuli would cause patients to suffer excessive mental anxiety). The design and furnishings of the seclusion area are influenced by this need to reduce external stimuli and maintain safety. They are typically sparsely furnished minimizing risk of any physical harm.
Key Point Summary
Added October 2012