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Knowledge Repository

The effect of hospital layout on caregiver-patient communication patterns

Author(s): Pachilova, R., Sailer, K.
This article suggests that the field of evidence-based design (EBD), which considers information from case evaluations and credible research during design-related decision processes, has only marginally examined hospital layouts and their effects. As a result, this study attempts to build on the tradition of “Space Syntax” research, which is a theory that explores how space controls and generates encounters between inhabitants and visitors of certain spaces and how these two groups engage in communication.
Key Point Summary

Physician-patient communication in the primary care office: A systematic review

Author(s): Beck, R., Daughtridge, R., Sloane, P.

"Let's Sit Forward": Investigating Interprofessional Communication, Collaboration, Professional Roles, and Physical Space at EmergiCare

Author(s): Dean, M., Gill, R., Barbour, J. B.
Due to the fact that emergency department (ED) caregivers are constantly involved in interprofessional, knowledge-intensive conversations, effective modes of communication necessarily play a key role in promoting patient health and safety. Previous studies have explored how the physical environment directly affects modes of communication, and how these two dimensions of the healthcare environment constantly intersect with each other.
Key Point Summary

Parental visiting, communication, and participation in ethical decisions: a comparison of neonatal unit policies in Europe

Author(s): Cuttini, M., Rebagliato, M., Bortoli, P., Hansen, G., de Leeuw, R., Lenoir, S., Persson, J., Reid, M., Schroell, M., de Vonderweid, U., Kaminski, M., Lenard, H., Orzalesi, M., Saracci, R.

Maximizing the Impact of Nursing Care Quality: A Closer Look at the Hospital Work Environment and the Nurse’s Impact on Patient-Care Quality

Author(s): Hendrich, A., Chow, M.
Current hospital work environments have inefficient work processes, physical designs, technology infrastructure, and organizational cultures that cause inefficiencies and nursing stressors that compromise direct patient care. This article reviewed the evidence relating to nursing work processes, physical space, infrastructure, and patient safety to promote transformational change to the nursing work environment.
Key Point Summary

Centralized vs. Decentralized Nursing Stations: Effects on Nurses’ Functional Use of Space and Work Environment

Author(s): Zborowsky, T., Bunker Hellmich, L., Morelli, A., O’Neill, M.
Information technology enables nurses to move away from traditional centralized paper-charting stations to smaller decentralized work stations and charting substations located closer to, or inside of, patient rooms. Understanding the tradeoffs presented by centralized and decentralized nursing station design could provide useful information for future design and the nurse environment "fit."
Key Point Summary

Post-Occupancy Evaluation of a Mental Healthcare Facility Based on Staff Perceptions of Design Innovations

Author(s): Kalantari, S., Snell, R.
Post-occupancy evaluation (POE) is a research method for gathering information on the effectiveness of new architectural designs in healthcare environments. POE can help healthcare providers and designers gauge whether or not a given design is achieving its intended purpose. Since evidence-based designs are becoming more widely implemented in a variety of healthcare environments, POE could prove useful in many different departmental contexts. The authors note that the application of POE in research focusing on mental healthcare facilities is rare, signaling a need for exploration
Key Point Summary

How Can We Help Staff transition to a New NICU design?

Author(s): Broom, M., Gardner, A., Kecskes, Z. , Kildea, S.
This article highlights the results of a literature review undertaken to identify transition strategies for staff who moved from an open plan unit layout to a single-room design (SRD) neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) layout.
Key Point Summary

Impact of the physical environment of psychiatric wards on the use of seclusion

Author(s): van der Schaaf, P. S., Dusseldorp, E., Keuning, F. M., Janssen, W. A., Noorthoorn, E. O.
Disturbed behavior and patient aggression within psychiatric wards can threaten both patient and staff safety. To manage these patients, psychiatric wards often will use coercive measures such as solitary confinement. Patient aggression arises from a complex interaction between patient characteristics, staff characteristics, and the characteristics of the physical environment of the psychiatric ward itself. Most studies have focused on the dynamics between patient and staff characteristics; little research has been done to investigate how the physical environment of psychiatric wards might influence patient aggression and subsequently the use of coercive measures.
Key Point Summary

Part 2: Evaluation and Outcomes of an Evidence-Based Facility Design Project

Author(s): Krugman, M., Sanders, C., Kinney, L. J.
After a western academic hospital implemented the recommendations of an interdisciplinary team that combined the principles of Transforming Care at the Bedside (TCAB) and Evidence-Based Design (EBD), an evaluation was necessary. This article (Part 2) presents the evaluation of the project.
Key Point Summary