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Knowledge Repository

A complete, user-friendly database of healthcare design research references MoreLess about the Knowledge Repository

The Knowledge Repository is a complete, user-friendly database of healthcare design research references that continues to grow with the latest peer-reviewed publications. Start with our Knowledge Repository for all of your searches for articles and research citations on healthcare design topics. Access full texts through the source link, read key point summaries, or watch slidecasts. Expand your search and find project briefs, interviews, and other relevant resources by visiting our Insights & Solutions page.

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Displaying 161 - 180 of 470

A companionship between strangers – the hospital environment as a challenge in patient–patient interaction in oncology wards

Author(s): Larsen, L. S., Larsen, B. H., Birkelund, R.
The authors allude to existing literature indicating the healing and therapeutic effect of hospital environments and the increasing evidence between healthcare environments and patient outcomes. In this study the authors explore through observations and interviews of patients how the hospital environment impacts the interaction between hospitalized cancer patients.
Key Point Summary
Added May 2015

Healing environments in cancer treatment and care. Relations of space and practice in hematological cancer treatment

Author(s): Høybye, M. T.
The author refers to the growing contribution of design in shaping hospitals that are environments of healing. This study aims to widen the understanding of these healing environments in the context of its social dynamics. The research involved an ethnographic study of patients undergoing treatment for hematological cancer in a hospital in Denmark.
Key Point Summary
Added May 2015

Fable Hospital 2.0: The Business Case for Building Better Health Care Facilities

Author(s): Sadler, B. L., Berry, L., Guenther, R., Hamilton, D. K., Hessler, F., Merritt, C., Parker, D.
The Fable Hospital, an imaginary facility with the best design innovations, was proposed in 2004, and the authors indicate that many healthcare systems have consequently adapted the principles in the building of their hospitals.
Key Point Summary
Added April 2015

Part 1: Evidence-Based Facility Design Using Transforming Care at the Bedside Principles

Author(s): Devine, D. A., Wenger, B., Krugman, M., Zwink, J. E., Shiskowsky, K., Hagman, J., Limon, S., Sanders, C., Reeves, C.
A western academic hospital reexamined its design strategy when after three years of building a new facility they had to plan for a new facility to meet their patient capacity. Using a combination of the principles of Transforming Care at the Bedside (TCAB) and Evidence-Based Design (EBD), an interdisciplinary team presented design recommendations.
Key Point Summary
Added April 2015

Ambient light levels and critical care outcomes

Author(s): Verceles, A. C., Liu, X., Terrin, M. L., Scharf, S. M., Shanholtz, C., Harris, A., Ayanleye, B, Parker, A., Netzer, G.
Several U.S. healthcare agencies endorse a guideline that requires the construction of windows in patient care rooms so that naturally regulated sunlight can contribute to interior ambient lighting. This recommendation has been adopted by agencies in 46 U.S. states. Few studies have analyzed the association between light levels and intensive care unit (ICU) outcomes. No previous studies have quantitatively measured light levels or assessed intermediate factors such as analgesic use.
Key Point Summary
Added March 2015

Healing environment: A review of the impact of physical environmental factors on users

Author(s): Huisman, E. R. C. M., Morales, E., van Hoof, J., Kort, H. S. M.
According to the authors, research that examines the physical environment and its impact on the healing and well-being of human beings has been growing in the last several years. There is increasing availability of literature on evidence-based design.
Key Point Summary
Added March 2015

Realizing improved patient care through human-centered operating room design: A human factors methodology for observing flow disruptions in the cardiothoracic operating room

Author(s): Palmer, G., Abernathy, J. H., Swinton, G., Allison, D., Greenstein, J., Shappell, S., Juang, K., Reeves, S. T.
The authors indicate that disruptions in the workflow of surgeries can extend surgery times and contribute to the escalation of healthcare costs.
Key Point Summary
Added March 2015

Using human factors engineering to improve patient safety in the cardiovascular operating room

Author(s): Gurses, A. P., Martinez, E. A., Bauer, L., Kim, G., Lubomski, L. H., Marsteller, J. A., Pennathur, P. R., Goeschel, C., Pronovost, P. J., Thompson, D.
Cardiac surgery, despite technological and medical advances, involves high risks related to adverse events and medical errors that occur in the operating room. The Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety (SEIPS) model was used to guide the research – focusing on the different variables (providers, physical environment, tools and technologies, tasks, organization) in the care environment and the impact of their interaction on patient outcomes.
Key Point Summary
Added March 2015

Patient Safety in the Cardiac Operating Room: Human Factors and Teamwork A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association

Author(s): Wahr, J. A., Prager, R. L., Abernathy, J. H., Martinez, E. A., Salas, E., Seifert, P. C., Groom, R. C., Spiess, B. D., Searles, B. E., Sundt, T. M., Sanchez, J. A., Shappell, S. A., Culig, M. H., Lazzara, E. H., Fitzgerald, D. C., Thourani, V. H., Eghtesady, P., Ikonomidis, J. S., England, M. R., Sellke, F. W., Nussmeier, N. A.
The cardiac surgical operating room is a complex environment, where patient lives are saved or considerably improved with the help of sophisticated equipment and skilled personnel. Although outcomes are improving, adverse events still occur, many of which are preventable. This statement is the result of a review of literature that presented evidence on patient safety and interventions that worked in enhancing patient safety in the cardiac OR.
Key Point Summary
Added March 2015

Sleep disorder in cardiac care units: A special look at noise and light effects

Author(s): Sheihki, M. A., Ebadi, A., Rahmani, H.
Patients in hospitals sometimes experience disturbed sleep because of environmental factors. The lack of adequate sleep has many adverse effects, and these effects are particularly critical in the case of patients in intensive care units (ICUs).
Key Point Summary
Added March 2015

Changes in patient satisfaction related to hospital renovation: Experience with a new clinical building

Author(s): Siddiqui, Z. K., Zuccarelli, R, Durkin, N., Wu, A. W., Brotman, D. J.
As hospitals increasingly implement novel designs geared towards patient satisfaction and improved care, further research into the details of patient satisfaction levels is needed. By understanding patient perceptions of these new, patient-centered built environments and the care provided within them, healthcare providers and designers could more accurately project which design decisions will provide improved levels of patient satisfaction within a variety of contexts.
Key Point Summary
Added March 2015

Using Music to Reduce Noise Stress for Patients in the Emergency Department A Pilot Study

Author(s): Short, A. E., Ahern, N., Holdgate, A., Morris, J., Sidhu, B.
High levels of noise within emergency departments (EDs) have been associated with higher levels of patient stress. Noise and the stress it causes have been observed as a contributing factor to slower recovery rates and overall lower rates of satisfaction among patients.
Key Point Summary
Added March 2015

The Physical Attributes of Healing Garden for A Century Old Healthcare Premises

Author(s): Ibrahim, F., Harun, W. M. W., Samad, M. H. A., Kamaruddin, W. N. W
The authors refer to previous research that examined the positive effect of gardens on the health of hospitalized patients. Two hospitals in Malaysia that were built in the late 19th century had designed gardens in the premises.
Key Point Summary
Added February 2015

Does patient-centered design guarantee patient safety?: Using human factors engineering to find a balance between provider and patient needs

Author(s): France, D. J., Throop, P., Walczyk, B., Allen, L., Parekh, A. D., Parsons, A., Rickard, D., Deshpande, J. K.
According to the authors, “human factors engineering is the study of human beings and their interaction with products, environment, and equipment”, and that over the years it has evolved from systems- centered to user-centered to socially-centered care.
Key Point Summary
Added December 2014

Space to care and treat safely in acute hospitals: Recommendations from 1866 to 2008

Author(s): Hignett, S., Lu, J.
Bed space, defined in this study as the area around an individual bed offering privacy either as a curtained or screened cubicle or a single room in a ward holding multiple occupants, is the most frequently repeated design envelope in an acute care hospital. Since patients, staff, visitors, and other people will occupy this space at one point or another for a variety of different purposes, a complex design challenge exists. In 1893, Florence Nightingale successfully argued for less cramped bedrooms and overall improvements in hospital designs.
Key Point Summary
Added December 2014

Ambulatory infusion suite: pre- and post-occupancy evaluation

Author(s): Shepley, M.M., Rybkowski, Z., Aliber, J., Lange, C.
The authors refer to the lack of research on the design of cancer facilities while emphasizing the need to study the impact of the physical environment of infusion suites on patient experience. This study evaluates the perceptions of patients and staff of two infusion suites – old and new, specifically in connection with social interaction, privacy, and access to nature.
Key Point Summary
Added December 2014

Exploring positive hospital ward soundscape interventions

Author(s): Mackrill, J., Jennings, P., Cain, R.
Research has repeatedly shown strong relationships between human health and the characteristics of physical environments, such as a given environment’s soundscape. A soundscape encompasses all the sounds generated within an environment, rather than a single sound source like an air vent. While there have been negative health effects associated with the excessive sound often produced in hospital soundscapes, there potentially could be beneficial outcomes in maintaining and thoroughly understanding the soundscapes of certain hospital areas.
Key Point Summary
Added December 2014

Can flooring and underlay materials reduce hip fractures in older people?

Author(s): Minns, J.
Falls resulting in fracture of the hip in older people are a major health problem worldwide. Flooring that is slippery and unsuitable footwear are other major factors contributing to the onset of fractures in the home. Building design should incorporate measures to minimize the risk of falls.
Key Point Summary
Added November 2014

Healthcare providers' perception of design factors related to physical environments in hospitals

Author(s): Mourshed, M., Zhao, Y.
Most aspects of the physical environment having an impact on staff outcome are determined during early design stages of a building’s lifecycle. Subsequent modifications at later stages are expensive and sometimes difficult to achieve due to the multidisciplinary nature of design decision making.
Key Point Summary
Added November 2014

Factors influencing evaluation of patient areas, work spaces, and staff areas by healthcare professionals

Author(s): Sadatsafavi, H., Walewski, J., Shepley, M. M.
One important element of high-quality healthcare delivery is a motivated and satisfied staff. Healthcare executives should regularly examine the factors that influence clinicians’ perceptions of satisfaction and quality so that necessary changes can be addressed.
Key Point Summary
Added November 2014