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Knowledge Repository

A complete, user-friendly database of healthcare design research references MoreLess about the Knowledge Repository

The Knowledge Repository is a complete, user-friendly database of healthcare design research references that continues to grow with the latest peer-reviewed publications. Start with our Knowledge Repository for all of your searches for articles and research citations on healthcare design topics. Access full texts through the source link, read key point summaries, or watch slidecasts. Expand your search and find project briefs, interviews, and other relevant resources by visiting our Insights & Solutions page.

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Displaying 181 - 200 of 470

A better physical environment in the workplace means higher well-being? A study with healthcare professionals

Author(s): Campos-Andrade, C., Hernández-Fernaud, E., Lima, M.-L.
Referring to literature that points to the physical and psychological demands of healthcare work, the authors note that a negative physical environment can add to stress, burnout, and the possibility of error in addition to having repercussions for the health and well-being of the workers. Noise levels, unit configuration, and patient room type (single or multi-bed) are some of the environmental factors that have been studied and found to affect the experience and well-being of nurses.
Key Point Summary
Added November 2014

The effects of physical environments in medical wards on medication communication processes affecting patient safety

Author(s): Liu, W., Manias, E., Gerdtz, M.
The physical environment of a hospital has a wide range of effects on the quality of care administered to patients. In the context of medication distribution, seamless communication among healthcare professionals of different backgrounds is imperative, and in many cases the physical environment itself can have positive or negative effects on this complex process.
Key Point Summary
Added November 2014

Analysis of the soundscape in an intensive care unit based on the annotation of an audio recording

Author(s): Park, M., Kohlrausch, A., de Bruijn, W., de Jager, P., Simons, K.
Patients receiving treatment in intensive care units (ICUs) are often subjected to elevated noise levels that can complicate recovery by disturbing sleep patterns and causing stress, anxiety, and changes in cardiovascular response. Although previous research has thoroughly analyzed the various sources of noise in ICUs, the authors of this study believe that inadequate recording and sound analysis techniques, as well as the presence of human observers collecting data, have restricted the depth of previous findings.
Key Point Summary
Added November 2014

Noise stress for patients in hospitals - a literature survey

Author(s): Notbohm, G., Siegmann, S.
Added November 2014

Effect of intensive care environment on family and patient satisfaction: a before–after study

Author(s): Jongerden, I. P., Slooter, A. J., Peelen, L. M., Wessels, H., Ram, C. M., Kesecioglu, J., Schneider, M. M., van Dijk, D.
Intensive care units or ICUs are changing from multi-bed units to single-patient room units. According to the authors, these changes may have an impact on family satisfaction. With the patient often in a critical non-communicative position, it falls on family members to make decisions and evaluate satisfaction.
Key Point Summary
Added November 2014

Validating Acoustic Guidelines for Healthcare Facilities - Evidence-Based Design Meets Evidence-Based Medicine: The Sound Sleep Study

Author(s): Solet, J. M., Buxton, O. M., Ellenbogen, J. M., Wang, W., Carballiera, A.
Added November 2014

The Impact of Environmental Factors on Nursing Stress, Job Satisfaction, and Turnover Intention

Author(s): Applebaum, Diane, Fowler, Susan, Fiedler, Nancy, Osinubi, Omowunmi, Robson, Mark
Key concepts include the impact of environmental factors on perceived stress levels of staff nurses.
Key Point Summary
Added October 2014

The Environment of Inpatient Healthcare Delivery and Its Influence on the Outcome of Care

Author(s): O'Connor, M., O'Brien, A., Bloomer, M., Morphett, J., Peters, L., Hall, H., Parry, A., Recoche, K., Lee, S., Munro, I.
There is a growing body of evidence demonstrating that in all healthcare settings, the design of discipline-specific space can influence patients and their health outcomes. The contribution of the physical environment to quality of life and well-being is also supported. Healthcare delivery has changed over the last three decades; however, the authors note that some ICUs and emergency departments have not fully adapted to these changes, whereas palliative care and women’s health have adapted to include more family involvement and patient-driven changes. Environments such as labor and delivery units have benefitted from active consumer involvement in design.
Key Point Summary
Added September 2014

Design for the post-antibiotic era: experiences from a new building for infectious diseases in Malmö, Sweden

Author(s): Holmdahl, T., Lanbeck, P.
Healthcare facilities must carefully consider how facilities are designed as infection control mechanisms evolve.
Key Point Summary
Added September 2014

Original sound compositions reduce anxiety in emergency department patients: a randomised controlled trial

Author(s): Weiland, T. J., Jelinek, G. A., Macarow, K. E., Samartzis, P., Brown, D. M., Grierson, E. M., Winter, C.
Patients being treated in emergency departments (EDs) might experience anxiety during their stay. The beneficial effect of music on anxiety has been well demonstrated in previous studies, but no previous study has investigated the potential anxiety-reducing effects of sound interventions or the use of binaural beats among adult ED patients.
Key Point Summary
Added September 2014

Effects of music intervention on physiological stress response and anxiety level of mechanically ventilated patients in China: A randomised controlled trial

Author(s): Han, L., Li, J. P., Sit, J. W. H., Chung, L., Jiao, Z. Y., Ma, W. G.
Mechanical ventilation (MV) is one of the most common treatments used in intensive care units (ICUs). MV is known for causing stress and anxiety in patients due to frequent instances of sleep deprivation, pain, fear, communication difficulties, loneliness, and lack of control. Heightened levels of anxiety can manifest in various detrimental physiological responses and ultimately lead to a sicker patient.
Key Point Summary
Added September 2014

Effects of patient-directed music intervention on anxiety and sedative exposure in critically ill patients receiving mechanical ventilatory support: a randomized clinical trial

Author(s): Chlan, L. L., Weinert, C. R., Heiderscheit, A., Tracy, M. F., Skaar, D. J., Guttormson, J. L., Savik, K.
Critically ill patients receiving treatment through mechanical ventilation (MV) are often given intravenous sedative and analgesic medications in order to reduce anxiety and promote ventilator synchrony and comfort. However, since these medications are often administered at high doses for long periods of time, they are frequently associated with various adverse health effects that can complicate healing and ultimately create more anxiety in the patient. Interventions that reduce anxiety with minimal use of sedative medications are needed.
Key Point Summary
Added September 2014

Noise and sleep among adult medical inpatients: far from a quiet night

Author(s): Yoder, J. C., Staisiunas, P. G., Meltzer, D. O., Knutson, K. L., Arora, V. M.
Added September 2014

Noise levels in an Australian emergency department

Author(s): Short, A. E., Short, K. T., Holdgate, A., Ahern, N., Morris, J.
Added September 2014

Noise pollution in hospitals: impact on patients

Author(s): Hsu, T., Ryherd, E., Waye, K. P., Ackerman, J.
Added September 2014

Associations of exposure to noise with physiological and psychological outcomes among post-cardiac surgery patients in ICUs

Author(s): Hsu, S. M., Ko, W. J., Liao, W. C., Huang, S. J., Chen, R. J., Li, C. Y., Hwang, S. L.
Noise can be an impediment to the sleep and recovery of a patient. An ICU has several instruments and devices that monitor a patient’s vitals as they recover from a surgery. The authors suggest that these essential ICU devices can produce substantial sounds that potentially impact a patient’s outcome.
Key Point Summary
Added September 2014

The effects of hospital noise

Author(s): Choiniere, D. B.
Added September 2014

Sleep Disruption due to Hospital Noises: A Prospective Evaluation

Author(s): Buxton, O. M., Ellenbogen, J. M., Wang, W., Carballeira, A., O'Connor, S., Cooper, D., Gordhandas, A. J., McKinney, S. M., Solet, J. M.
Hospital noises can have a negative effect on a patient’s sleep pattern. Sleep disruption is associated with hypertension, cardiovascular disease, impaired immunity, and elevated stress. Limited information is available on the connection between specific sounds and sleep physiology.
Key Point Summary
Added September 2014

Effect of hospital noise on patients' ability to hear, understand, and recall speech

Author(s): Pope, D. S., Gallun, F. J., Kampel, S.
Added September 2014

Sound intensity and noise evaluation in a critical care unit

Author(s): Lawson, N., Thompson, K., Saunders, G., Saiz, J., Richardson, J., Brown, D., Ince, N., Caldwell, M., Pope, D.
Added September 2014