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Knowledge Repository

    Shaping the slats of hospital patient room window blinds for daylighting and external view under desert clear skies

    2016
    Solar Energy
    Journal Article

    Volume 133, Pages 1-13
    Author(s)
    Sherif, A./Sabry, H./Wagdy, A./Mashaly, I/Arafa, R.
    Many previous studies have shown how natural lighting can contribute to the healing nature of a hospital’s environment by reducing patient fatigue, stress, and length of stay. Desert locations are often characterized by continually clear skies, making control of the sunlight even more essential to patient satisfaction. It is therefore important to determine the optimal shape of window blind slats so that discomfort can be reduced without compromising levels of illumination.

    Managing Patient Falls in Psychiatric Inpatient Units: Part 2

    2016
    The Health Care Manager
    Journal Article

    Issue 2, Volume 35, Pages 121-133
    Author(s)
    Abraham, S.

    Managing Patient Falls in Psychiatric Inpatient Units: Part 1

    2016
    The Health Care Manager
    Journal Article

    Issue 1, Volume 35, Pages 21-27
    Author(s)
    Abraham, S.
    A significantly higher number of patient falls occur in hospital inpatient psychiatric units than in medical-surgical areas, resulting in issues with overall patient safety. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention considers patient falls a concern to society due to the safety issues they pose and financial strains they can cause for institutions. 
    Patient Satisfaction and Comfort
    Fall related outcomes|Patient health outcomes|Patient satisfaction and comfort
    Hospitals

    To see or not to see: Investigating the links between patient visibility and potential moderators affecting the patient experience

    2016
    Journal of Environmental Psychology
    Journal Article

    Volume 47, Pages 33-43
    Author(s)
    Bosch, S. J./Apple, M./Hiltonen, B./Worden, E./Lu, Yi/Nanda, U./Kim, D.
    The amount of visibility between patients and nursing staff contributes significantly to the balance between feelings of security and autonomy. Hospitals in which patients are in constant view of the staff can create a sense of restricted freedom, but high visibility can also be associated with higher levels of patient safety. There has been ongoing debate within the medical community as to how a perfect balance between security and autonomy can be implemented. This study took place at a hospital with a radial nursing unit. 
    Patient Satisfaction and Comfort|Physical proximity/density|Visibility
    Patient satisfaction and comfort|Staff productivity / efficiency|Visibility
    Hospitals

    Presence of human noroviruses on bathroom surfaces: a review of the literature

    2016
    International Journal of Environmental Health Research
    Journal Article

    Volume online first, Pages 1-13
    Author(s)
    Leone, C. M./Tang, C./Sharp, J./Jiang, X./Fraser, A.

    The design and initial evaluation of visual cues in carpets to assist walking

    2016
    The Journal of The Textile Institute
    Journal Article

    Issue 3, Volume 107, Pages 376-385
    Author(s)
    McNeil, S. J./Tapp, L. S.
    One way to reduce the occurrence of indoor falls for both elderly people and other individuals is to improve the design of floor coverings so that they can help create a safer walking environment. A growing number of studies are showing that the design of products such as carpets can specifically help older people lead more productive and independent lives by empowering them through safer opportunities for mobility. 
    Attractiveness of physical environment|Patient Satisfaction and Comfort
    Fall related outcomes|Patient health outcomes|Patient satisfaction and comfort
    Ambulatory care facilities|Hospitals|Non-healthcare settings|Other healthcare facilities|Residential healthcare facilities

    Profile of inpatient falls in patients with dementia: A prospective comparative study between 100% single rooms and traditional multibedded wards

    2016
    Journal of Clinical Gerontology and Geriatrics
    Journal Article

    Volume in press, Pages 1-6
    Author(s)
    Knight, S./Singh, I.
    A previous study estimates that the number of people with dementia in the U.K. could reach over 1 million by the year 2025. This possibility places added pressure on U.K. hospitals to develop safer methods for taking care of patients with dementia. Dementia is associated with impaired mobility, and previous studies have shown that individuals with dementia are two to three times more likely to fall. Inpatient falls (IFs) account for nearly two-fifths of the patient safety incidents reported to the National Reporting and Learning System, and the risk of IF is highest in single-patient rooms. There are very few studies that examine the impact of dementia and IF in single rooms as compared with traditional multi-bed wards.
    Fall related outcomes|Patient health outcomes
    Hospitals

    Meeting the Needs of Visually Impaired People Living in Lifetime Homes

    2016
    Journal of Housing For the Elderly
    Journal Article

    Issue 2, Volume 30, Pages 123-140
    Author(s)
    Rooney, C./Hadjri, K./Rooney, M./Faith, V./McAllister, K./Craig, C.
    Lifetime Homes standards (LTHS) are a group of mandatory public-sector housing design interventions used in the U.K. They attempt to provide a model that ensures adaptable and accessible homes for the entire duration of an occupant’s stay. Changes in one’s physical environment, much like the ones implemented by LTHS, could help reduce the impact of disabilities such as visual impairment, and could help give patients different degrees of communal living with some level of independence.
    Patient Satisfaction and Comfort|Physical proximity/density
    Patient health outcomes|Patient satisfaction and comfort
    Non-healthcare settings|Residential healthcare facilities

    Determining high touch areas in the operating room with levels of contamination

    2016
    American Journal of Infection Control
    Journal Article

    Volume in press
    Author(s)
    Link, T./Kleiner, C./Mancuso, M. P./Dziadkowiec, O./Halverson-Carpenter, K.

    Effectiveness of an extended period of flashing lights and strategic signage to increase the salience of alcohol-gel dispensers for improving hand hygiene compliance

    2016
    American Journal of Infection Control
    Journal Article

    Issue 7, Volume 44, Pages 782-785
    Author(s)
    Rashidi, B./Li, A./Patel, R./Harmsen, I. E./Sabri, E./Kyeremanteng, K./D'Egidio, G.
    Hospitals are often full of information and attention-seeking signs, colors, and noises, making it difficult for something as inconspicuous as alcohol-gel hand dispensers to stand out apart from everything else. Therefore if a hospital wishes to increase rates of hand hygiene compliance, the design and location of hand sanitizer dispensers is of high importance. In a previous study, the authors of this paper showed that affixing a flashing red light to alcohol-gel dispensers for one week doubled hand hygiene rates from 12.4% to 25.3%.