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Knowledge Repository

A complete, user-friendly database of healthcare design research references MoreLess about the Knowledge Repository

The Knowledge Repository is a complete, user-friendly database of healthcare design research references that continues to grow with the latest peer-reviewed publications. Start with our Knowledge Repository for all of your searches for articles and research citations on healthcare design topics. Access full texts through the source link, read key point summaries, or watch slidecasts. Expand your search and find project briefs, interviews, and other relevant resources by visiting our Insights & Solutions page.

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Displaying 161 - 180 of 472

Delusions and Underlying Needs in Older Adults with Alzheimer’s Disease

Author(s): Wang, J., Cheng, W., Lai, P., & Pai, M.
The purpose of this study was to understand the influences of earlier life experiences and the current environment on delusions, as well as the underlying needs of individuals with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) experiencing delusions.
Key Point Summary
Added January 2016

COMMUNI-CARE: Assessment Tool for Reactions and Behaviors of Patients with Dementia in a Multisensory Stimulation Environment

Author(s): Lopez, J. J. B., Martorell, J., & Bolivar, J. C. C.
Snoezelen translated into Dutch means “smell, feel and snooze/relax.” Snoezelen is either a room or room enhancements that provide a multisensory experience. They were created to reduce the unpleasant effects of sensory deprivation in patients with learning disabilities. Today they are used on patients with a variety of psychological and behavorial symptoms.
Key Point Summary
Added January 2016

Non-Pharmacological Interventions in Long-term Care: Feasibility and Recent Trends

Author(s): Fitzsimmons, S., Barba, B., Stump, M. & Bonner, E.
This article discusses the use of non-pharmacological interventions as part of an effort to minimize the negative effects of antipsychotic drug use on patients with cognitive impairment or perceived behavioral issues. Aspects of the built environment were included.
Key Point Summary
Added January 2016

An Empirical Examination of Patient Room Handedness in Acute Medical-Surgical Settings

Author(s): Pati, D., Cason, C., Harvey Jr., T.E., Evans, J.
The initial cost of designing hospitals with standardized same-handed patient rooms is typically much higher than the cost of hospitals designed with mirror-image configurations. This is because same-handed units require separate utility lines for each patient room rather than shared medical gas lines and bathroom plumbing lines between every two rooms.
Key Point Summary
Added January 2016

Destination Bedside

Author(s): Watkins, N., Kennedy, M., Lee, N., O’Neill, M., Peavey, E., DuCharme, M., & Padula, C.
Patient-centered care (PCC) has been at the core of healthcare reform. Improvements and advancements in Healthcare Information Technology (HIT), Electronic Health Records and inpatient unit layout have been some means that aim to achieve PCC. Also key to PCC is the alleviation of medical errors, which HIT and related technology can help achieve.
Key Point Summary
Added January 2016

Factors affecting optimal lighting use in shared hospital environments: A case-study

Author(s): Maleetipwan-Mattsson, P., Laike, T., Johansson, M
The consumption of energy is high in hospitals. Artificial lighting, according to the authors, uses a sizable proportionate share of a hospital’s electricity consumption. The authors refer to literature that identifies two factors influencing the use of lighting and the consequent energy consumption: the design features of a building and the behavior of the facility’s occupants.
Key Point Summary
Added December 2015

Using Lean-Based Systems Engineering to Increase Capacity in the Emergency Department

Author(s): White, B., Chang, Y., Grabowski, B., Brown, D.
Emergency department (ED) crowding is a widespread issue that causes a multitude of negative effects on patient care quality, safety, and efficiency. Lean-based systems engineering, which is often used for industrial manufacturing, is a method for eliminating all forms of waste (including wasted time and other resources) to optimize productivity. Recent studies have begun to demonstrate the use of systems engineering and improvement science on streamlining processes and improving throughput in different medical capacities, but an opportunity remains to refine the application of these tools within EDs in particular.
Key Point Summary
Added December 2015

Wayfinding Behaviors In A Healthcare Environment: A Case Study Analysis Of Individual Differences

Author(s): Sevinç, Z., Bozkurt, E.
Wayfinding in healthcare facilities is often a challenge. Given the complexity of the space, its multi-functionality and the assortment of activities that take place on its premises, the inability to smoothly find one’s way in a hospital can add to a patient’s stress.
Key Point Summary
Added December 2015

A hierarchical facility layout planning approach for large and complex hospitals

Author(s): Helber, S., Böhme, D., Oucherif, F., Lagershausen, S., Kasper, S.
Added November 2015

Network of Spaces and Interaction-Related Behaviors in Adult Intensive Care Units

Author(s): Rashid, M., Boyle, D. K., Crosser, M.
Using three spatial network measures of “space syntax”, this correlational study describes four interaction-related behaviors among three groups of users in relation to visibility and accessibility of spaces in four adult intensive care units (ICUs) of different size, geometry, and specialty. Systematic field observations of interaction-related behaviors show significant differences in spatial distribution of interaction-related behaviors in the ICUs.
Key Point Summary
Added November 2015

A study of agitation, conflict and containment in association with change in ward physical environment

Author(s): Jenkins, O., Dye, S., Foy, C.
Patients in psychiatric intensive care units or PICUs can be a threat to themselves, staff, and other patients because of aggressive and agitated behavior. The authors allude to past research where such behavior has been attributed to age, gender, diagnosis, psychopathology, substance abuse, staff-patient interaction, as well as staff, patient, and environmental traits.
Key Point Summary
Added October 2015

Is It the Place or the People? Disentangling the Effects of Hospitals’ Physical and Social Environments on Well-Being

Author(s): Andrade, C. C., Lima, M. L., Devlin, A. S., Hernández, B.
The authors allude to evidence regarding the role of the physical environment in healthcare settings on patient well-being. They also refer to literature that indicates the relevance of positive relationships with healthcare providers as crucial to patient well-being.
Key Point Summary
Added October 2015

Impact of the physical environment of psychiatric wards on the use of seclusion

Author(s): van der Schaaf, P. S., Dusseldorp, E., Keuning, F. M., Janssen, W. A., Noorthoorn, E. O.
Disturbed behavior and patient aggression within psychiatric wards can threaten both patient and staff safety. To manage these patients, psychiatric wards often will use coercive measures such as solitary confinement. Patient aggression arises from a complex interaction between patient characteristics, staff characteristics, and the characteristics of the physical environment of the psychiatric ward itself. Most studies have focused on the dynamics between patient and staff characteristics; little research has been done to investigate how the physical environment of psychiatric wards might influence patient aggression and subsequently the use of coercive measures.
Key Point Summary
Added October 2015

Improving Pediatric Radiography Patient Stress, Mood, and Parental Satisfaction Through Positive Environmental Distractions: A Randomized Control Trial

Author(s): Quan, X., Joseph, A., Nanda, U., Moyano-Smith, O., Kanakri, S., Ancheta, C, Loveless, E. A.
To evaluate how a positive environmental distraction intervention impacted pediatric radiography patient behavioral stress-responses, mood states, and parental satisfaction.
Key Point Summary
Added September 2015

Healthscapes: The role of the facility and physical environment on consumer attitudes, satisfaction, quality assessments, and behaviors.

Author(s): Hutton, J. D., Richardson, L. D.
Added September 2015

Fall prevention and bathroom safety in the epilepsy monitoring unit

Author(s): Spritzer, S. D., Riordan, K. C., Berry, J., Corbett, B. M., Gerke, J. K., Hoerth, M. T., Crepeau, A. Z., Drazkowski, J. F., Sirven, J. I., Noe, K. H.
Injury-inducing falls are one of the most common harmful events that occur in epilepsy monitoring units (EMUs). Considering the risk provoked by epileptic symptoms such as spontaneous seizures, patients admitted to EMUs may be more likely to sustain falling injuries over patients in other areas of the hospital.
Key Point Summary
Added September 2015

Experimental analysis of the transport of airborne contaminants between adjacent rooms at different pressure due to the door opening

Author(s): Fontana, L., Quintino, A.
Creating pressurization and depressurization spaces in hospitals is practiced to control airborne contamination. The authors indicate that the literature suggests that turbulence created by the opening and closing of doors between spaces of different pressure allows for the difference in pressure to be overcome and consequently for the transfer of contaminated air into the clean area.
Key Point Summary
Added May 2015

Patient Safety in the Cardiac Operating Room: Human Factors and Teamwork A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association

Author(s): Wahr, J. A., Prager, R. L., Abernathy, J. H., Martinez, E. A., Salas, E., Seifert, P. C., Groom, R. C., Spiess, B. D., Searles, B. E., Sundt, T. M., Sanchez, J. A., Shappell, S. A., Culig, M. H., Lazzara, E. H., Fitzgerald, D. C., Thourani, V. H., Eghtesady, P., Ikonomidis, J. S., England, M. R., Sellke, F. W., Nussmeier, N. A.
The cardiac surgical operating room is a complex environment, where patient lives are saved or considerably improved with the help of sophisticated equipment and skilled personnel. Although outcomes are improving, adverse events still occur, many of which are preventable. This statement is the result of a review of literature that presented evidence on patient safety and interventions that worked in enhancing patient safety in the cardiac OR.
Key Point Summary
Added March 2015

Tailored lighting intervention improves measures of sleep, depression, and agitation in persons with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia living in long-term care facilities

Author(s): Figueiro, M. G., Plitnick, B. A., Lok, A., Jones, G. E., Higgins, P., Hornick, T. R., Rea, M. S.
In 2010, an estimated 5.1 million elderly Americans were affected by Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia (ADRD). Individuals with ADRD are often transferred into controlled environments due to common behavioral symptoms such as nocturnal wandering, disturbed sleep-wake patterns, agitation, and verbal or physical abuse.
Key Point Summary
Added March 2015

Including patients, staff and visitors in the design of the psychiatric milieu

Author(s): Perkins, N. H.
Most research addressing environmental design for healthcare facilities focuses on expert-determined and expert-driven outcomes. Little attention has been given to the perspectives offered by those who are ultimately using the facilities, namely the patients, staff, and visitors. Participatory design and planning (PDP) is a method that takes these non-expert opinions into consideration while operating under three assumptions. First, healthcare facilities are complex environments that require a team of people who can understand and maintain structured information necessary for optimum design.
Key Point Summary
Added December 2014