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Knowledge Repository

A complete, user-friendly database of healthcare design research references MoreLess about the Knowledge Repository

The Knowledge Repository is a complete, user-friendly database of healthcare design research references that continues to grow with the latest peer-reviewed publications. Start with our Knowledge Repository for all of your searches for articles and research citations on healthcare design topics. Access full texts through the source link, read key point summaries, or watch slidecasts. Expand your search and find project briefs, interviews, and other relevant resources by visiting our Insights & Solutions page.

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Displaying 241 - 260 of 470

Quiet Time in a Pediatric Medical/Surgical Setting

Author(s): Cranmer, K., Davenport, L.
Despite being places for rest and healing, hospitals often are noisy places. These rising sound levels can be harmful and stressful for patients, caregivers, and staff, as well as contribute to an unsatisfactory environment in which to work and heal. In response, some intensive care units now have quiet time to reduce noise levels. However, little is known about the benefits of quiet time in a pediatric medical–surgical setting.
Key Point Summary
Added January 2014

Sound Spectral Analysis in the Intensive Care Nursery: Measuring High-Frequency Sound

Author(s): Kellam, B., Bhatia, J.
Little is known about how high-frequency, prolonged intense noise effects auditory development in preterm infants. However, some research indicates that premature infants who are exposed to persistent noise might experience some interference with their development of frequency discrimination and problems with sound-pattern recognition.
Key Point Summary
Added January 2014

Falls Aren't Us: State of the Science

Author(s): Cozart, H. T., Cesario, S. K.
Falls among the elderly can cause serious injury and sometimes even be fatal. However, in healthcare settings, many of these accidents can be avoided with fall-prevention interventions. The ninth goal of The Joint Commission is environmental intervention and addresses safety features such as patients’ introduction to hospital surroundings, appropriate lighting and noise reduction, call alarms, as well as reachable and available grab rails.
Key Point Summary
Added January 2014

Noise Levels in a General Surgical Ward: a descriptive study

Author(s): Christensen, M.
The noise levels in many UK hospitals exceed those recommended by the World Health Organization, yet are so prevalent that healthcare providers tend to think of them as just part of the working environment. However, current ward-based research is dated, perhaps indicating that the control of noise in these areas is perceived as insurmountable.
Key Point Summary
Added January 2014

Unpleasant and pleasant memories of intensive care in adult mechanically ventilated patients—Findings from 250 interviews

Author(s): Samuelson, K. A. M.
Patients’ perspectives on the intensive care experience are essential to improve patients’ comfort and well-being during and after a stay in the intensive care unit (ICU). This research approach was unique as the author used data from a large number of patient interviews (n = 250) and a validated qualitative content analysis technique to create themes from the data. One of the themes included—environmental distress—described aspects of the physical environment that patients remembered as causing distress.
Key Point Summary
Added January 2014

Neonatal Response to Control of Noise Inside the Incubator

Author(s): Johnson, A. N.
Premature infants are at risk for long-term neurologic, cognitive, and behavioral problems. Therefore, supporting these medically fragile infants as they adapt to life outside the womb by decreasing possible environmental stressors, such as noise, is important. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Committee of Environmental Hazards recommends that neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) sound levels below 45 dB. Yet these babies are often in incubators, which are associated with higher sound levels from the equipment and surrounding environment.
Key Point Summary
Added January 2014

Nighttime Noise Issues That Interrupt Sleep After Cardiac Surgery

Author(s): Spence, J., Murray, T., Tang, A. S., Butler, R. S., Albert, N. M.
Hospital unit environments have excessive environmental ambient sound levels. In cardiac-surgical, general, and neonatal intensive care units, sound levels were commonly more than 50 dBand spiked to 80 dB and 100.9 dB. Common sounds associated with routine care in a postsurgical intermediate care unit have a decibel level in the range of heavy truck traffic (about 80 dB). Noise influences the physiological state of sleep. It is important to reduce nurse-generated and environmental noise when patients are trying to sleep.
Key Point Summary
Added January 2014

Using Rapid Assessment to Evaluate Noise on an In-Patient Unit

Author(s): Deitrick, L.M., Kennedy, P., Cyriax, C., Davies-Hathen, N.
Research shows that many hospitals are noisy from a variety of sources: people, environment, and machines. Further, this excessive noise can have negative effects on patients and staff including lost sleep, higher blood pressure, lower overall patient satisfaction, increased readmission rates, and increased employee stress levels.
Key Point Summary
Added January 2014

The sound environment in an ICU patient room—a content analysis of sound levels and patient experiences

Author(s): Johansson, L., Bergbom, I., Wayeb, K. P., Ryherd, E., Lindahl, B.
This study was a prestudy for the planning and design of a larger one, where the aim is to investigate the relationship between sound (objective and subjective) and adult intensive care unit (ICU) delirium and/or other factors. It used sound measurement, behavioral observation, and interview methods. The results provide a good list of sound/noise impact on patients and subsequent ICU design considerations.
Key Point Summary
Added January 2014

Can modifications to the bedroom environment improve the sleep of new parents? Two randomized controlled trials

Author(s): Lee, K. A., Gay, C. L.
One of the major challenges of new parenthood is adjusting to the sleep disruption that comes with caring for a newborn. Parents-to-be know that caring for an infant with random sleep and feeding patterns will mean sleep deprivation and fatigue, but few are prepared for the actual physical and emotional demands.
Key Point Summary
Added January 2014

Noise in the Operating Room—What Do We Know? A Review of the Literature

Author(s): Hasfeldt, D., Laerkner, E., Birkelund, R.
Noise is a general stressor and should be avoided in the operating room (OR). However, over the last 10 years, while the focus has been on preventing air pollution and maximizing sterility in the OR, very little attention has gone toward preventing noise pollution. Meanwhile, there is more and more noisy technological equipment in the OR, and it can be assumed that problems with noise in the OR have not decreased.
Key Point Summary
Added January 2014

Patients’ Interactions in an Intensive Care Unit and Their Memories of Intensive Care: A Mixed Method Study

Author(s): Meriläinen, M, Kyngäs, H, Ala-Kokko, T
The various equipment and devices in the intensive care unit (ICU) make it the most technologically sophisticated environment in any hospital. But, from a patient’s perspective, being connected to various devices; experiencing unsettling noises, smells, lighting, and uncomfortable temperatures; and enduring the perceptions of other patients as care objects can cause both physical and mental stress.
Key Point Summary
Added January 2014

Sleep and the sleep environment of older adults in acute care settings

Author(s): Missildine, K.
Not every patient has difficulty sleeping in an acute care setting, but it is common. Environmental factors, such as light and noise, can interfere with sleep, further compromising an existing sleep problem. Environmental light, considered a primary cue for setting the internal clock and maintaining normal day/night rhythms, is often different in acute care settings compared to home and may affect sleep.
Key Point Summary
Added January 2014

Sleep promotion in the intensive care unit—A survey of nurses’ interventions

Author(s): Eliassen, K. M., Hopstock, L. A.
For patients in the intensive care unit (ICU), sleep deprivation could lead to a variety of physical and psychological issues (Friese, 2008) that impact the healing process and increase morbidity and mortality. There are many factors that contribute to poor sleep. This small-scale study investigates the perceptions of the sleep-promoting interventions that ICU nurses provide.
Key Point Summary
Added January 2014

Environmental Noise Sources and Interventions to Minimize Them: A Tale of Two Hospitals

Author(s): Dube, J. A. O., Barth, M. M., Cmiel, C. A. , Cutshall, S. M. , Olson, S. M., Sulla, S. J., Nesbitt, J. C. , Sobczak, S. C., Holland, D. E.
Delivering patient care in a hospital is noisy. Yet research shows that noise interferes with the healing process and can disrupt the patient’s experience. Higher noise levels are linked to stress reaction; sleep disturbance; and increased heart rate, blood pressure, and muscle tension, creating an overarching issue that touches multiple disciplines and departments in the hospital.
Key Point Summary
Added January 2014

Does music influence stress in mechanically ventilated patients?

Author(s): Chlan, L.L., Engeland, W.C., Savik, K.
Many critically ill patients find that mechanical ventilator is stressful. Often, healthcare providers manage that stress with sedatives. However, as with most medications, the drugs may have side effects. For this and other reasons, many healthcare professionals prefer to try nonpharmacologic interventions first before administering sedative agents.
Key Point Summary
Added December 2013

Children’s Experience Regarding the Quality of Their Hospital Stay: The Development of an Assessment Questionnaire for Children

Author(s): Chappuis, M., Vannay-Bouchiche, C.., Fluckiger, M., Monnier, M., Cathieni, F., Terra, R., Piot-Ziegler, C.
Pediatric care quality in Switzerland is evaluated mainly through the parents’ opinion. There are no assessment questionnaires for children. However, research indicates that often, what the parents think does not match their children’s evaluation of the quality of care and that they are often low to moderately correlated. This study examines on the development of a questionnaire assessing the satisfaction of children with their hospital stay.
Key Point Summary
Added December 2013

Achieving EBD Goals Through Flooring Selection & Design

Author(s): Nanda, Upali, Malone, Eileen, Joseph, Anjali
Added April 2013

The effects of material selections on noise levels in two patient care units

Author(s): Frederick, C., Roy, K. P., Taylor, E., Keller, A., Jackson, M., Kinsey, R.
Added March 2013

Lighting and perceptual cues: Effects on gait measures of older adults at high and low risk for falls

Author(s): Figueiro, M., Plitnik, B., Rea, M., Gras, L., Rea, M. S.
The visual system plays an important role in maintaining balance while navigating the environment. Older adults often depend heavily on visual information to maintain balance and orientation due to age related changes that affect their vestibular system (contributes to balance and spatial orientation) and somatosensory system (that moderates sensations of touch, smell etc.). Even small reductions in visibility could severely impact their gait and balance and potentially result in a fall. Even in healthy older adults, gait becomes slower and step lengths become shorter under dim lighting conditions.
Key Point Summary
Added November 2012