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Safety

The built environment plays an important role in patient, staff, and resident safety, as the physical design of a healthcare facility directly affects outcomes such as medical errors, falls, infections, and staff injuries. Among the many environmental measures that can be taken to improve safety outcomes are single-bed patient rooms, air quality control, reduced noise levels, easy-to-clean surfaces, accessible alcohol hand-rub dispensers, and ceiling lifts. 

Insights & Solutions

Webinar
January 2018 Webinar
When we design healthcare facilities, we may not always have a complete understanding of how we can proactively design for safety and account for risk beyond fire and life safety. How can we more effectively consider safety issues like infections, falls, medication errors, injuries associated with patient handing or behavioral health, and security? This webinar introduces the new, easier to use, online interface for The Center’s Safety Risk Assessment (SRA) toolkit, a proactive and systematic approach to designing and renovating healthcare facilities for safety. Originally developed through research and consensus to support the requirements of the FGI Guidelines, The Center's research team will walk you through the why, what, and how of each part of the online SRA toolkit illustrating features with vignettes gathered from the testing process.  
Tool
September 2017 Tool
The Safety Risk Assessment (SRA) Toolkit is: a proactive process that can mitigate risk a discussion prompt for a multidisciplinary team an evidence-based design (EBD) approach to identify solutions. The SRA targets six areas of safety (infections, falls, medication errors, security, injuries of behavioral health, and patient handling) as required in the FGI Guidelines. WHY USE THIS SRA?
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Tool
February 2017 Tool
These modules consist of Issue Briefs, Backgrounders, and Top Design Strategies, and were created as a supplement to the Safety Risk Assessment toolkit.
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